Jump to content

Extendable draw-leaf refectory table, English revival period


Debora Beijerbacht

Recommended Posts

This table was my excuse to build one of the many constructions that are out there are to extend a dining table. One of these methods is this draw-leaf construction, or pull out, where the leaves are stowed underneath the table top when not in use. I figured that's a really neat feature if you like to 'play' with your miniatures.  

 

First I made a modern version of this type, to get to grips with the construction and when that one run smooth I turned to this one;

 

post-10-0-32152600-1398261381_thumb.jpg

 

This original was listed on the site of an antique dealer, but with my understanding of the construction and mechanism under the belt I scaled out a plan.

 

post-10-0-29705300-1398261414_thumb.jpg

 

Some joint were a bit unclear but I could fall back on period cabinet making books to figure them out. I decided to make it from cherry to represent the the oak wood that this 19th Centure refectory table is made of best.

 

post-10-0-56095900-1398261487_thumb.jpg

 

The aprons had some lovely carvings on them, so I added those before assembly.

 

post-10-0-82835800-1398261570_thumb.jpg

 

Just like the melon feet; I carved and stained them first. 

 

post-10-0-46374700-1398261628_thumb.jpg

 

The sliding mechanism was the final job.

 

post-10-0-63725500-1398261765_thumb.jpg

 

Here's what it turned out to be;

 

post-10-0-78891100-1398261811_thumb.jpg

 

post-10-0-50695500-1398261863_thumb.jpg

 

post-10-0-18350600-1398261905_thumb.jpg

 

post-10-0-08056000-1398261950_thumb.jpg

 

post-10-0-61304000-1398261992_thumb.jpg

 

post-10-0-62521900-1398262037_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow.... I love it! The mechanism and the carving are great. I really like the way you have aged it, especially the top. I have a ring like that on a 18 th c. table I have that I wish was not there.

It is also so nice to see your process is so well thought out. Maybe I would make less mistakes if I did better drawings?

Thanks for sharing it with us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

For those that didn't notice, this is one of the wonderful pieces Debora submitted for her Artisan. One look at and it is obvious why she was selected. Fantastic work and congratulations!

Also, I think this table will be part of a display at Castine?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe Debora will post the links to all five the pieces she submitted, they are all on her blog with lots of in progress photos, it was fun to see her working especially hard since Castine last year, I was pretty sure all the pieces she was showing on her blog was going to be part of her submission.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That video of how the table works is great..... You even built a test table to try it out.....

I'm going to try to copy it here?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have been told this piece will be on display at the exhibit opening night at the Guild School. Like all of her pieces this is outstanding in all ways, it will take your breath away. It defines miniatures as a true art form. Congratulations, Deborah, your hard work has paid off big time, for the pleasure of us all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is an Artisan piece??? I think the committee should have skipped her right over to Fellow. Some times there are miniaturists who come along that are Fellow quality from the get go. I feel the Committee should be able to the Artisan and award Fellow status to these people. Deborah is one of these people in my minds eye.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got to see Debora's table in person. Not only does it look great and it works, but it feels good! Yes, it will be on display in Castine with her 4 other submission pieces. Congratulations!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Beautiful work!  It is a fantastic piece.  I love that you have put a coffee ring on the table top, to add to the realistic aged look.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had to watch the (wonderful) video twice to figure out that there are springs that enable the extensions to work and keep the top from falling off. Or moving, since in real, one hardly ever tips the table like Debbie does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bonnie, there are no springs in it, it's actually all wood and just gravity dropping the top back in place. You've got to play with it in 2 weeks time! Then you'll see its actually pretty nifty but simple!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This table is really wonderful ! I am sorry that air won't be at Castine to see it in person. I hope you will continue to show us your wonderful works here on this forum... It is certainly what it is all about ! Thanks so much for sharing with us !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Stunning is a great description of this table.... I had the pleasure of a good close look and chance to operate it!..... If you think it looks great here just imagine it in your hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Darn, I had only 15 minutes for a quick view of the exhibit just before they took it down, so didn't get a close look at anything.  So glad to get to see it here along with the video.  I did see the artisan pieces, but didn't realize the table extended.  It's truly amazing work, especially the carving and aging!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HI Missy, I had the same thing, so much to see and just sooo little time! I'm glad there are some great pictures of the class results being posted. Especially that last night is just too short to take it all in. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...