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Pietre dure


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Hello everyone, i'd like to start by saying how great it is to have the chance to get in touch with so many talented persons in a variety of fields, yet another reason to say thank you I.G.M.A for the wonderful job they do.

Now i have been struggling to find someone who could do this work in miniature. Pietre dure, marquetry using semi precious stones and marble, i haven't really seen anything like it in miniature. Does anyone know who might be interested to take on such a challenge?post-546-0-83368500-1447106992_thumb.jpg

Or has anyone seen an antique piece in 12th scale or a similar scale? Would love to hear from you, many thanks...

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Welcome to the fineminiaturesforum.

I have thought for years this might be the perfect application for a CNC laser if it would cut through the stones.

The closest thing I have seen to this type of work, and it is already miniature, are the Italian micro mosaics. These have been made for hundreds of years. The antique ones tend to be much finer. I have a beautiful old one that I have always wanted to incorporate in the perfect miniature piece. Sadly it is not big enough for a table. Here is a little write up on the history of these. Goggle micro mosaic for pictures.

http://www.lifeinitaly.com/art/micro-mosaics.asp

As for the pietre dure, there is a museum in Florence that is high on my list for the next time I'm there. As with the micro mosaics there is a lot of this work sold in gift shops but it tends to be tourist quality. Here is a little write up finding this type of work.

http://selectitaly.com/blog/tips-travelers/pietre-dure-where-to-see-buy-eternal-paintings-in-florence/

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Thank you so much for the links and great information, the seashells in the Lapis stone looks amazing. I feel there is a gap in the market regarding Pietre dure in miniature, then again how many of us would go looking for that at a show? But to be completely honest, i don't usually go to a show with a shopping list, never worked for me. When I'm at a show i look for whatever i find is made to perfection, even if it's a period i have no interest in or an item i could never incorporate in a scene. The point is i would have a piece that i could enjoy even if it rested on a shelf or in a showcase. The high level craftsmanship achieved is what matters.

I suppose the closest thing would be micro mosaic but it's not entirely the same. I've come across an artist called Ligia Durstenfeld, who made a seventeenth century Florentine Pietre dure cabinet, she inlays with enamel instead of stone. I found an article about her in International Doll's house news magazine Aug/Sep 2000! 

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I saw some of those tables in Rosenburg castle in Copenhagen last year, absolutely breathtaking.

Interesting that this subject is coming up right now, I have been wondering for the last week how one cuts stone down to miniature size, there is a Cape Dutch table that I want to make that has a slate inset top. One suggestion I got from a guy at one of those stores that sells items made from stones and crystals was to sand a stone tile down to the right thickness...I am thinking that working with stone in miniature especially for inlay work is not going to be very easy...then again jewellers has made tiny items out of stone for a very long time, so it must be possible.

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Fantastic video, thank you Victoria.

It makes me want try pietre dure but I have a much more complex project on my plate right now!

I know what the guy in the video was talking about when he mentioned that the thin cut cut stone looses it's color. I found this when trying to make a piece from Amber, I started with a really dark piece but by the time I cut it to scale it appeared completely clear.

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I know the heart wants what the heart wants... but some options come to mind... 

 

1)  Christina Minischetti does fabu work with the don't- breath- or- you- can- blow- away- your- tiny- tiles - faux polymer micro mosiacs...

2)  Diane Almeyda does exquiste work in enameling, so at least it is glass...albeit not semi precious stone....

 

AKA, I do not know your real identity... but if you have not already attended Guild School,  come to GS and learn about these techniques... hang out with the people who can make your dreams become reality...

 

3)  Cutting tiny, tiny slices of stone sounds like a real exacting process... I think this may be another bone application and perhaps you can dye the bones and then lacquer...you will have different textures with the different kinds / section of bone....

 

4)  there are faux painting artists.... Sue Veeder, Bluette Meloney ...come to mind instantly... and I found someone in Architectural Digest, name escapes me now, but the faux marble in the article was incredible....

 

5)  www.AreneandKates.com are the only stone cutters that I am aware of in the Miniature scene here in the US.... I found their website from the Bishop Show list.  (I am a little sheltered though, and have not been to all the shows in the US... so I do not know everyone!)  There website is in its 'beginning' stages, but at least you can email for initial contact.

 

Tamra

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I love micro mosaics. I have collected them for many years. I cannot imagine using of one the really old ones to incorporate into a miniature but some of the newer ones might be OK. Meaning the Victorian if you could find the right image.

 

The angels was the first one I bought. The dog is Victorian.

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post-20-0-65410000-1447184252_thumb.jpg

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Yes Bill and the same thing goes for tortoise shell, but i wonder if you heard about the miniature room box of the amber room? It was made by the people who made the real replica in the Russian Palace in 2004 i think. They used real amber for the miniature and it looks fantastic, I've seen the miniature version in person.

 

Thank you Tamra for the many options, but surely someone could make the real thing. I'm Ahmed Al Thani by the way and Castine is at the top of my list of to do things.

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Is the dog micro mosaic Catherine? if it is it's incredibly fine. I bought a large micro mosaic and gave it to a miniature palace builder to incorporate it in the floor of one of the rooms. 

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hmmmm.... I wonder if micro thin stone would burst when lasered.  I think you would need a CNC water jet.  I perceive the programming of the design isn't as difficult as the getting the materials to be thin for the application.   And... I think I have a contact for the water jet if that is of interest for you, and she is a miniaturist.  I can call her...

 

Ahmed, I do hope that you are able to come to Castine; it is a wonderful experience! 

 

Tamra

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<Light Bulb>... If I were doing this for me... I would use acrylic and dyed wood for my mediums.  Pen blanks are easily machined, and they are available in wonderful square pieces for pen blanks which means I can more easily cut slices off with a table or band saw...... and from my limited pen turning experience, I know that acrylic can be polished.

 

I have no lapidary experience cutting stone - but with acrylic & wood, I think these materials would create wonderful results.

 

Catherine, both pieces are exquisite... if you are able to carry them safely and they are not too fragile,  and also attending the Chicago show, would you consider bringing them with you?  I do not think that I have ever seen an antique micro mosaic in person.

 

Tamra

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Thank you Catherine for sharing, I know Cristina's work well and have some of her beautiful mosaics. I will have to talk to her and see how she feels about working in the same technique with varied size stones to make it as close as possible to Pietre dure.

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