Jump to content

Art nouveau shop window


Recommended Posts

miniarquitect

This is one of my latest miniature architecture work: an art-nouveau shop window inspired in the buildings of Domènech i Montaner, an architect who work mainly in Barcelona, the last quarter of XIX century and the first one in XX century, the same time that Gaudí, Puig i Cadafalch, Jújol... and so many others, building a new and "modern" city thanks to a very wealthy bourgeoisie who funded many important projects.

It is made of stone, granite, sandstone, marble.. (obviously artificial stone). More than 30 new moulds, altmost 450 pieces. A puzzle in which none mistake bigger that 0,5 mm could be accepted not only in individual pieces but also in all its length (only 47 cms) .

As usually in my work, and in fact, in any european city, the shop-window has been refurnished to show a collection of modern lights, some of them designed one hundred years after the building!
 

some photos under the sun light

 

post-96-0-82995300-1425713521_thumb.jpg

post-96-0-46506000-1425713525_thumb.jpg

post-96-0-40729600-1425713529_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
miniarquitect

and these ones at night

 

post-96-0-86425400-1425713589_thumb.jpg

post-96-0-83498400-1425713592_thumb.jpg

 

more details in my art galleries

 

www.artmajeur.com/miniarquitect

www.artquid.com/miniarquitect

Link to post
Share on other sites
Warren Barnard

Simply Beautiful as usual, you work continues to be impeccable and a delight to the eye.

 

yours in miniatures

 

Warren

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wm. R. Robertson

That is wonderful!..... I hope to see it in person sometime, still working on that.

You mention molds, that implies castings, so what do you cast in? Plaster? Urethane? Epoxy?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Duh?  Those are pictures of the miniature aren.t they?  I really thought it was the original full size building. I was waiting fro pictures of the miniature. How great!  Like Bill R I am interested in the materials you used, especially for the castings. 

 

Bill H

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
miniarquitect

thank you Warren, Elga, and "Bills"

In another post, about floors, Elga asked about this. the molds are made of silicone, but after, I fill them with a kind of mortar in order to reproduce color, grain and texture of real stone, in this mortar you can find sands, pigments, plaster, plaster of Paris, water, liquid resin, powder of marble..., according to the stone I want to reproduce. Some of them have five or six different products.

The final colour and texture (obviously after casting, some "stones" must be "washed" or polished as in real ones, and this in all its mass and volume, so if I cut a piece, it keeps the colour and grain, just as a real stone.

it is not a surface painting. i try to recreate the real materials in miniature. And till here I can tell you my tecnique!!

in the next photos you can see this texture and colour, well, it is better on live!

 

sandstone in the walls, rose granite, the column and white limestone for the capital

 

post-96-0-07474400-1425743782_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Wm. R. Robertson

Now we know why your stone, etc. looks so real.... that is because it sort of is with each mold mix being a little different.

Thank you.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guy Gadois

I give up! I am gob smacked! There is no way I could even approach the quality of this work. Mind boggling. Maybe I'll take up pressing wild flowers instead.

 

Regards,

Guy

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
WeekendMiniaturist

Guy, the pressed flowers reference is funny.  I cannot imagine the recipe to make miniaturized stone, but after overthinking the mixture of the different materials mentioned, I would enjoy learning about silicone molds.  I understand the use of silicone is flexible and this gives me the ability to remove the cast piece from the mold, but how do you keep the mold thin enough to pull the part, and make it thick enough to not be distorted by the weight of the materials you are casting.

 

We had a local (real life) mold making professional come to miniature club and the only thing I took from those two meetings is that I understand a little bit about the not having "bad" undercuts.  I've got a lump of clay to play with and some tools, but I still haven't made that perfect hat stand that could be casted from resin.

 

Miniarquitect it is a beautiful project.

Link to post
Share on other sites
miniarquitect

hello WeekendMiniaturist,

when we work in one inch scale, we reduce sizes twelve times. this means that volumes are reduced 1728 times (12x12x12), consequently, weight is also 1728 times smaller (if we use the same material that the original one). So, the problem you describe is quite far to be my biggest worry.

It is true that my pieces are fragile (they are not made of polyurethane or other resins), and if they are thin  (about 2 mm or less), they can break when I remove from the mold. But they break like real stone, and sometimes, a fissure can be realistic in my façade (a few number of fissures of course!, an excess of them is simply a ruin!!)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...