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Falling Water Diorama?


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Guy Gadois

I have been contemplating making a diorama of Frank LLoyd Wright's house for some time but the task of duplicating all of the many stone walls has discouraged me from starting the project. I would appreciate suggestions of possible methods that could be employed to construct the walls so that I could finish this in my lifetime! 

 

Cheers,

Guy

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Guy, that is quite an ambitious project.  Will you try to make an exact scale replica? or a model in the likeness of...? Perhaps you can make a mold and cast them?

 

Bill, that is beautiful brick work for the link that you posted.  So much to learn, so little time...

 

Tamra

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Teresa layman

Bill, Thank you so much for that link!  I followed it and I think that looks like a wonderful way to make brickwork! I ordered some of the material and can't wait to try the technique! His instructions and photos are really top notch. I have been looking for a good, simple way to make nice looking brick surfaces for a couple of months now. Thanks again!

Teresa

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miniarquitect

Hello Guy,

Stone walls are the most difficult things in miniature, because you build with a natural element that is not homogeneous nor shape, neither texture or colour, so you combine big pieces and fill the holes with small ones. Except in some cases as ashlar work.

But this case is different. You work with slate (or something similar) and you have a very regular and continous horizontal joints.

So I suggest you do dyed plaster strips (casted in silicone moulds) of different thicknesses and cut them trying to reproduce the wall design. (plaster of Paris)

when is dried you can erode the surface with a knife ir order to give this angular surface, not polished as slate has. and in the plaster surface the effect is quite realistic

Then protect with an acrylic semi-gloss vernish and finally fill the joint with coloured glue plaster

 

This, of course, if you work in a big scale: 1/12, 1/10 or even 1/20!!

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Guy Gadois

Bill Hudson: a lot of techniques on this site. Thanks for the link. 

 

WeekendMiniaturist: I will build it to scale to the limits of my abilities, which will, hopefully, be adequate to the task.

 

miniarquitect: I like the processes you have described. I will have a go with them.

 

I also have been investigating the possibility of using polymer clay and etching in the stones.

 

Guy

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