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Lining or Pin Striping


jackofalltrades

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jackofalltrades

The miniature I am planning to build next will require some lining or pin striping.   

 

I have a ripidograph/leroy lettering pen set and am wondering if anyone has had experience using this type of pen for lining with paint ?  This set is all metal  and intended to use with ink and the Leroy lettering guide.

 

Jack

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Bill Hudson

Jack,

 

I believe Carol Harding used them to stripe her sleigh years ago.  I have not tried them but I have had reasonable luck with drafting split, adjustable pens. The paint needs to be thinned to ink constancy.  I practice on sheet styrene; it has a similar drag as paint on the wagon. A note of caution: the pens do leave a impression in the base paint so you usually only get one shot at making it right.   

 

lliB

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jackofalltrades

Bill,

 

What you said encourages me to give it and the bow pen a try !     What type of paint/varnish do you use on your wagons.   Have you ever done a clear lacquer over coat?

 

Jack

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Bill Hudson

Jack,

 

In the past I have used lacquer for painting my vehicles.  I would not advise clear lacquer over enamel as it will crinkle the enamel.  You can use enamel over lacquer though with out a problem as long as the lacquer is several days dry. I used  use rattle can enamels many years ago but the modern ones are pure crap (my opinion) for model work. The new lacquers are not much better.

 

I have had success with artist fixatives to give a matt finish on enamel.  To get the feel and to test paints I set up a large piece of cardboard, spray it with lacquer primer and do tests of various paints and how they cover and repaint..  Write on each one what it is for future reference. 

 

llib

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jackofalltrades

Greenie,

 

What a beautiful cart!  Precisely, what is it?   What did you use for the tires?

 

An Alps or similar EK dyesub printer is something of my dreams.   I have had a couple of guys who have done decals for me but hadn't considered striping.  Most of the Alps decals I have had made were white and not very opaque.  I think much depends on color since some of the color logos I have had done are beautiful.

 

I think the art of lining is something I want to learn and is going to take some practice on my part.   Something to tinker with when waiting for glue to dry!  I have a bow pen and ripidograph pens to try out.     If I'm not comfortable with lining directly on the miniature I probably will go with decals that I make my self using pen/paint  on decal film.  There are straight lining decals available but the curves are the problem.  If I want to get as complex as your cart lining I'll have to get some appropriate software.

 

Beautiful cart!

 

Jack

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Bill Hudson

What Greenie says.  If you still want to try wet striping ([paint) I would recommend 1- Shot (sign painter's) enamels.  They are opaque paints and come in a huge variety of colors.  Even when thinned down to ink consistency they cover well. 1- Shot can also be thinned enough for use in an air brush for painting  wagon boxes.

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jackofalltrades

Bill,

 

Thanks!   I will look into1-shot.   I just bought some Floquil paint but need to find a good replacement for it.  What solvent thins 1 shot?

 

Jack

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Bill Hudson

Bill,

 

Thanks!   I will look into1-shot.   I just bought some Floquil paint but need to find a good replacement for it.  What solvent thins 1 shot?

 

Jack

Jack,

 

Anything that will thin enamel.Stay away from the newer acrylic paint thinners, they act more like lacquer thinners. Nice thing about 1 - shot is that it most commonly comes in half pint cans. It also can be bought in large sizes.

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miraclechicken

I used to freehand paint lettering (full size) on sides of trucks. I used 1 shot. It was wonderful stuff with the sign painters brushes. Thinned with mineral spirits/stoddard solvent. 

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Bill Hudson

That is how I got introduced to it.  I had a sign painting business and also painted race cars for dirt track jalopy races. Got good money for painting one door. I bought the business, (a paint kit and a few customer names) from an old man who need wine money.    He was using 1 shot. I also did pen striping; still have my pens (brushes).

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Guy Gadois

Jack,

 

I use a striping tool made by Beugler. It takes a little practice to get good results but the tool is well made and made in the USA. I use OneShot paint slightly reduced. The narrowest wheel is 1/64".

 

Link to their website.  http://www.beugler.com/

 

I no longer have a need for mine, so I may sell it if anyone is interested.

 

Cheers, Gadois

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Bill Hudson

Yes I have looked at it.  I was able to try one out several years ago when I took a week long wheel wright class in Moscow Idaho. I liked it but I could not get much less than a quarter inch radius 90 degree curve although my instructor could do some amazing stuff with his.  I have started saving the money for one for when (if ever) I get to that point on the popcorn wagon.

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jackofalltrades

Beugler tools look good but I decided that the tool would be difficult to use to produce good corners and that they are expensive.   I found out about them from a  horse drawn vehicle Guild I belong to and was hoping that they would be a good option.

 

I hadn't heard the term "Stoddard's solvent in many years.   What I don't like about mineral spirits is the drying time.    Floquil enamel was always fast drying when thinned with Floquil thinner or lacquer thinner.  Fast drying means less dust from the shop gets in the finish and less stench in the house since I can run the spray booth longer.

 

I already have a bow pen and Rapidograph pens so less $ to spend going that route.    I have seen British railway modelers using purpose built lining guides which might be a good method to explore.  The guides could be made by hand fabrication or CNC cut from plastic.   Maybe CNC controlled pen?

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Guy Gadois

Jack,

 

The tape seals very well and being made by 3M one would expect it to. Removing the tape after striping leaves no residue and it will not lift any underlying paint. Attached is a pic of a chuck wagon I striped using the tape. The actual striping is much sharper than it appears in the (digital) photo.

 

Cheers, Gadois

 

 

post-225-0-69325100-1417567680_thumb.jpg

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Guy Gadois

Jack,

 

Oops, reposted!

 

The tape seals very well and being made by 3M one would expect it to. Removing the tape after striping leaves no residue and it will not lift any underlying paint. Attached is a pic of a chuck-wagon I striped using the tape. The actual striping is much sharper than it appears in the (digital) photo.

 

Cheers, Gadois

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