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Hand protection


Bill Hudson

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Bill Hudson

Taking a side step:  In doing tin work I find holding tin to cut and work with between my fingers and thumb can be painful from the sharp edges and sometimes hard to hold. I found this stretchy sticky tape that works well to pad my fingers and gives me a good grip on the work piece. It also works well for carving wood. I found it at a local safety shop but Woodcrafters has similar only a bit rougher.  The tape is flexible and can be molded to your finger and it sticks to itself and your finger.  I find a bit of talcum powder keeps one finger from sticking to the other.  Micro-Mark used to have something similar called alligator tape. In the past I had a cloth tape impregnated with a sticky wax and it worked the same way only it was easy to mold it to your finger and you could remove it in tact and put it back on later. It has been discontinued because the wax was flammable and you could end up with a finger candle if working around flame.

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Bill, this is a great practical tip to keep from getting cut for tin work.  I wonder if this is similar to heavyweight cotton stretch tape used for medical applications?  I found a roll 2" x 55 yards for $2.65.  I wish I had known about this when I was going through my Stained Glass phase.  I will have to write a note about this and tape it to my stained glass lamp shade form, in the event the stained glass bug bites again.

 

Tamra/Indiana

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Bill Hudson

Another choice of hand protection tape.  This is my favorite as it can be molded, used , removed and used again. It is called Alligator tape and I finally found it through Rio Grande.  Part no.201 329/4 comes in a four roll pack.  I first wrap several turnaround my finger behind the first knuckle then cut two inch strips and run it from the bottom of the finger and over the top to the tape again.  I do the same with another strip on the sides of the finger. Then wrap more wraps around the finger from knuckle to finger tip.  I like to cut short strips and build up along the bottom of the finger and over the tip to make it heavier. Then one more wrap around the finger to the tip. This makes a nice little cocoon for your finger. The same for the thumb.  Once you are finished working the cocoon can be slipped off the finger and used again.  I cut a slit on the top so it will slip back on the finger then tape it closed with a wrap of the tape.  Great stuff. Protects the fingers and still can feel through it. 

 

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Bill, Does this feel like tack cloth?  I obviously need to go through my Rio Grande catalogs again, because I'm missing some cool things with great applications.

 

Tamra/Indiana

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Bill Hudson

​Yes it is some what like tack cloth only not as smelly and sticky and the alligator skin does not stick to you like tack cloth.  It is best not to use it while working with a torch, it is quite flammable.

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miraclechicken

As I posted in the other topic, the same stuff is also called Vet Wrap and not expensive compared to the same product with "specialized" applications, like wood carving or metal work---Linda.

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Bill Hudson

As I posted in the other topic, the same stuff is also called Vet Wrap and not expensive compared to the same product with "specialized" applications, like wood carving or metal work---Linda.

Linda I believe you are referring to the first type of wrap posted. I moved the topic over here as it was hyjacking the tin tutorial.  I don't see this last one working as it is not sticky enough or flexible enough to wrap dogs. This is more like a gauze with impregnated with a wax.  I suppose it would hold a bandage with enough wraps but the first type is better for that purpose. The purpose here is protecting fingers which it does a good job of doing.

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Moderator4

Bill Robertson posted this in the original Forum, Tinware Tutorial: "Another thing to use to protect your fingers is the fingers of fine ladies kid leather gloves. I buy the gloves, sometime new, sometimes at flea markets to use the leather. You don't get much out of the fingers so I just cut them off, sometimes pull out the lining and slip them over my fingers. They fit real tight but you still have the sensitivity of touch through them."

 

Other pertinent comments will be moved here and then deleted from the Tin tutorial at Bill Hudson's suggestion, to avoid diverting that forum.

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miraclechicken

haha Bill you hijacked yourself :) anyhow, I have both the green (looks exactly like in your post above) from a woodcarving catalog years ago and the vet wrap, and they are the same except for the price, which is why I posted. Maybe the price is better now and maybe the product is better, this is all I have to go on.  I don't hold bandages on with it, I use it like you do, and I can slip it off and reuse. I only throw it out when it gets too cut up from carving. I've also bought heavy cloth band aids, they last for multiple carving sessions. But that would be the most expensive option I would think---

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Bill Hudson

To clarify for any one reading this who might be confused between the two finger wraps. The first one looks like sticky Ace bandages, is stretchy and very flexible   Very much like and is probably the same as the various stuff used for holding cotton or gauze in place after blood test or holding bandages on. I'm sure the same type of stuff is also used in Vet offices. It is bulky but good for craving especially if you carve with the knife in you fingers and use your thumb as leverage. It will stop you from getting those little slits in your thumb that go with that type of carving.

 

The second tape is made of a gauze and is impregnated with a waxy substance. It sticks to itself but not to the fingers so to say. It is not very flexible for bending sideways.  My experience of it is that it can be built up from several strips to a thickness to protect the ball of the finger or thumb, can be removed and reused later. It is flammable and if you are a klutz then it should not be used around flame or a torch.  I do use it when using a torch and have not had a problem because I am careful. Even with a heavy buildup it is more sensitive to touch (and not as bulky) than the first type.

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