Jump to content

Real Tin Sheet


Catherine Ronan

Recommended Posts

Catherine Ronan

I love your tin hat. The curly feather is perfect!

 

I wanted to make some French flower buckets and a watering can. I bought K&S "TIN" to make them. I should have known by the price it isn't tin at all. It is some sort of steel. It was soft enough for me to make these pieces though. I cut a plate so I could use a chasing tool to burnish the rings in the metal before I formed them into a containers.

 

I would love to have some real tin sheet. Where did you buy the tin for the hat?

 

 

 

DSCN1800.JPG

 

DSCN1673.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Catherine,

 

​I about you will find anything else.  The tin you want is normally referred to as "dairy tin" pro feristan tinplate. Or tin plated iron or steel.  It has been so for many years. The biggest problem I have had is the metal kinks when rolled. That is why I developed rolling using a web belt as mentioned in an earlier post on bending brass tube.  I do have a lot of real dairy tin, it does in five foot square sheets, which is a tad bit thicker than some of the K&S. It is not as shiny as The hobby tin and some sheets quite aged from so many years of storage.  I do still have the same problem with it although I feel it works better.  Where do you Live?

 

If the the flower buckets and watering can are miniatures you made, those are very well done, they cone across wonderfully.

 

I have a tin tutorial I would be happy to post on this forum if it is OK.

 

Bill

Link to post
Share on other sites
Catherine Ronan
Bill,

 

Thank you for your reply. That is all very interesting. I am going to go read your web belt post. I would love to read about how you bend brass tubing without crimping it.

 

I live in Memphis Tennessee.

 

Yes, The French flower buckets and the watering can are 1: 12 scale miniatures. I made then for a friends French flower shop project.

 

I hope you will post the tutorial you mentioned. I look forward to it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

​I really don't see that I have any thing to teach you. :D  Wonderful work. I will work on getting the tutors so I can post it here.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Bill Hudson

Lynda,  Thanks for posting this. I am not familiar with this plate.  Many years ago I purchased 25 pounds of dairy tin plate which came in 5' x5' sheets.  I had these cut down to a size I could handle. At that time I was into black powder and I was making candle holders and pierced candle lamps for blanket sales at the camp.  I later used it to make my 1/12th scale pedal cars.  When I taught classes at Castine I found the K&S tin sheet more handy to ship and more workable.  Although both are listed as being .010 thick actually the dairy tin mikes out to be .0091 thick and the K&S is .0085 thick. I find the K&S tin works the best. My experiance is that the dairy tin is stiffer than the hobby tin.  If the advertised tin actually .010 then it would be stiffer and heavier to work than either the dairy tin or the hobby tin.  

 

I recently unpacked my dairy tin and found it had gotten moisture in between the sheets and most have rust stains some pretty bad.  I have shared some better smaller sheets with a member of this fourm just for her to play around with. It has been many years since I did any miniature tin work and today I tried to get back at it using the dairy tin.  Besides having 80+ year old eyes and stiff fingers the dairy tin was the pits to work.  I found my stash of hobby tin and it worked much better. I would be tempted to order a sheet just to compare but I already have more tin than I know what to do with.

 

I will set back some of the best dairy tin for pedal car bodies. The rest I think I will recycle and stick to the hobby  (K&S) tin for my tinware.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill,

Glad to know the K&S works well. I ordered some plate from Tin Girl and will run a comparison.

 

Taking an unstructured jewelry class this summer and plan to experiment there - access to lots of metalworking tools. Do you hard solder your tin?

 

After watching the video of your pedal cars and other work, I can't wait to try to replicate a pedal biplane we made for our kids when they were small. I love things that really work and move.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Lynda,

 

Yes I solder my tin. Don't get caught up in fancy soldering irons just get the cheap hobby ones, no more than 35 watts. Look for the ones with replaceable silvered (tinned) copper tips as you can file them to shape you want. Steel tips are worthless for mini work in most cases.

 

I will probably order some tin from her too and also a couple of her project plans (although out of scale) just to see if she is using useful methods.  I think if so building a few of her projects would be a good exercise in learning for beginners where takinga class is not available. I won't  recommend them until I am sure they are of any value. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...