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Aging a glass window


MeezerMama

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MeezerMama

I need some suggestions please for "aging" a "leaded" glass window (glass soldered together with copper foil).   I have already aged the lead solder and I need to dirty up the glass.  I don't want it grimy, but I don't want it to be pristine and clean, either.   It's going on an old but not derelict building. 

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Gail Geiger

One suggestion that may help: make a “dirty” wash by taking a small amount of white glue, like Elmer’s, and mix with acrylic paint like black and burnt sienna . You can dilute the paint with water to get the shade you want, then mix it with the glue. Paint this on your window and let dry. It can be rubbed with a cloth if you want to have a clean area like in the middle of the pane. Finely sifted hobby “dirt” like the kind you find in train stores, or cigarette ashes can be used in window corners depending on the look you want. You could experiment by painting a thin layer of the mixture on a scrap piece of glass at first.

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WeekendMiniaturist

http://www.thomasopenhouse.com/tips_howto.html

I am sure you are aware of these articles,  but for other forum members, here is an index from Pat Thomas...  

My gut instinct would have me leaving the window(s) outside and then mother nature can contribute to the project...

Steam and a very fine mist (from the kitchen) of some kind of oil + dirt and a fan, may also help speed up the process.... (outdoors of course!) Now where is my mortar and pestle so I can ground up dirt?

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Bill Hudson

I age my blacksmith shop windows with real strong coffee or tea wash. Lay the window down flat and wash on around edges, let dry and apply again until you get the desired finish. You can dab in the middle lightly while still wet. Then use an artist flat fixative spray to hold it all in place. The fixative spray does not show, it is used on charcoal and such drawings to hold all in place. Be sure to get artist fixative not flat acrylic spray. You can also use India ink in a very light wash (this is more permanent and hard to remove) I also use sidewalk (poster) chalk.  Wet a soft artist brush and rub it on the chalk to form a puddle on the chalk of the color you want. This can be wiped off so use fixative here too.

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