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Wave molding machines


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Bill Hudson

Very interesting but in German. Large PDF file ail take sown down load time. Part of the abstract below in English.  The rest to the PDF is in German.

 

 

Abstract

In the report wave-mouldings from the 17th through the 19th Centuries are studied from a craft historical perspective. Focus of the thesis is concentrated on wave-moulding using the scraper technique.

The thesis consists of three parts:

  1. The historical background and a report of wave-moulding and moulding machines with

    origins in Germany in the beginning of the 17th Century.

  2. The construction of a wave-moulding machine. The foundation for the practical work has

    been studies and analysis of written sources about the handicrafts.

  3. Practical experiments and the manufacturing of a wooden strip using this newly

    constructed machine. The purpose of the experiments has been to gain information about the function and the actual crafting using different techniques. 

 

 

 

http://www.dominikmatus.cz/files/Dřevo/Holandská%20lišta/Hopp-%20och%20Flamlister.pdf

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Bill Hudson

Thanks Niels, show how much I don't know.  I knew it was a language  I could not read.  It would be nice if some one could translate the newer version details at the end of the PDF.  I can sort of figure out how it works.  

 

Bill

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miraclechicken

Too bad Chrome didn't ask me if they could translate for me, because looking at that wave, I am clueless. 

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Bill Hudson

I'm not clueless I pretty much understand the concept.  If I really took the time to study and work out some of the things I do think I could build a machine for miniature wave moldings.

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Wm. R. Robertson

I did this years ago with a milling machine, the next time I did it I made a fixture out of wood for the Cameron drill press. I'll have to fine those pictures and post them. I plan to more of this and the next time I think I can do it by just grinding a cutter for my Striaght Line Engine..... It has all the features built into to this kind of work in miniature...... I think the range might be a max of 10" long.

Also, those engraving by Roubo, I have originals of those I bought years ago at a Paris Flea market for just a few dollars....

Thanks for posting it, it is a great resource and explains this really well....... Assuming my understanding of Swedish is any good.

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Wm. R. Robertson

Here is the photo of one of my pieces with wave molding, this was done in boxwood. The trim is tortoise shell, mirror is nickel and Annelle Ferguson did the 72 count needlework.

 

Photo10of105_zps9a1ce37c.jpg

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jackofalltrades

Interesting subject that I have never tried.   Wish I could read the text in that link!

 

Very nice results on the mirror!  

 

I found a nice diagram of the Moxon waving engine which might be quite reasonable to make.   I think the tough part might be making the serpentine guides in miniature scale.

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ElgaKoster

Lovely mirror Bill R and thanks for posting the link Bill H, now there is something more I want to learn how to do.

Surely somewhere there must be some info on this in English, although I can figure some of the Swedish out, it isn't enough to make any sense.

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karincorbin

Speed of movement is controlled with the gear ratio, the linear pattern design is created by the cam (track) follower, pressure appliied to control the depth of cut per passage is controlled by the spring.

 

Another variation of controlled pattern cutting production methods based on this same machine design principal are the Rose Engine lathes, also known as  ornamental lathes.

 

You don't really need a translator. But a video would be a big help if you have never seen cam followers in action.

 

My first introduction to creating repeating patterns with cams that had a follower and used a gear controlled feed was the Bernina Sewing machine I purchased in 1972. But in that instance the pattern produced was linear and the cams were circular. If you were to look at the stitch patterns it produced you could see the potential of wave forms that might be cut into wood.

 

This kind of project of building a wave cutting device is where those laser cutters and 3D printers come in very handy. They can be used to quickly produce gears and cams as well as various other parts for creating specialized tools for making miniatures.

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Wm. R. Robertson

Karin is quite right but instead of a rose engine a Striaght Line Engine would be much better..... Both work on the same principle, one does a Striaght line with a liner cam, the other does a connected line, ie. circle, oval, etc. with a round cam.

I have a Striaght line machine, here is a picture of it......

post-5-0-44755300-1425573533_thumb.jpg

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karincorbin

Very interesting tool. I see that it qualifies to be part of your unique  sculpture collection on display in your living room :)

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