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Kickstarter for Contemporary Dollhouse Furniture


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Moderator1

I agree, I'm not sure what to think of it either...... There is some good in it, a young person making things, the use of CNC and modern design however that is being done at much higher quality levels.

And there is plenty of bad here too, general quality looks commercial, some of it like drawer sides are way out of scale, upholstery is clunky and the dolls are just plain scary.

I do wish her luck in making her goal, which she almost has.

Please comment on what you think of this, the quality of the work is not up to the standards here but does the method and the way she is going about warent discussion?

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WeekendMiniaturist

I'm glad that you posted this Paul.  I hope the market will always allow for simple, well made, affordable furniture to exist, and I think it is commendable for the miniature community to support her efforts.  Kickstarter is a great way to get a following for your marketing efforts, once you are invested, you will watch the progress and purchase if you like the results.  What a great way to grow a customer base.  I would rather have my furniture or other kits CNC'd then laser cut, so I think there is a lot of opportunity to be a miniature CNC cutter, instead of a laser cutter.  Nothing wrong with diversifying your income.  The miniature market needs products at all price points.  If we only make expensive items, we will not be able to reel in the collector with modest disposable income, and then someday, they can covet those fine collectibles and go to Guild School and learn to make them... or in my case, attempt to make them and practice, practice, practice!  Tamra/Indiana

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  • 1 month later...
Warren Barnard

Hmmmmmmmm not sure about this one, I'm happy that someone has got the backing to buy the machines they want to build the style of furniture they feel is missing in the dollhouse field.

 

But I also feel that they are quite toyish, very made in China feel and here we are discussing them on fine miniatures forum.

 

Having the modern tools to make something is fine, it still takes creative thought to make something better with them than with older tools. Some people say to me it must be easy having a laser cutter to make things, but I say it's just a machine that does what it's told time after time. I have to decide what I want to make, what material's to make it from, which tool is best for making particular pieces and then set up the tool to do that. Whether it's a laser cutter, a mini table saw, a lathe, a scalpel or a piece of sandpaper, tools are needed but more importantly, creativity is absolute to make something that others will want and appreciate.

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  • 5 weeks later...

I went to look at it, I noticed this:

 

A lack of contemporary dollhouse furniture is keeping the dollhouse hobby stuck in the past. Together we can revitalize this fun hobby!

 

 

Really?  (the lifesized contemporary junk) that looks like someone threw it together in 5 minutes in a factory in China out of a slab of particle board with fake plastic wood "veneer" glued on top,  and four square legs thrown on it and being called a "contemporary coffee table" is holding the dollhouse hobby back because of the lack of miniature copies of this thoughtless, boring, factory produced cardboard box-like junk we have today?

I had no idea!

 

I do not like contemporary, modern anything because it just looks like boring,  cheap, thrown together junk made with a minimal effort- and it is, that's why you can buy a "wood" table and set of  chairs at Menards for $199.95 for the whole thing- it's machine pressed cardboard called "particle board" covered with a thin fake wood grain covering.

 

I do believe that  interest in "dollhouses" per sei, by young girls have been on the decline for quite a while, not because of the lack of "contemporary" furniture but because today's 12 year old girls are not the same as the 12 year old girls in 1910, today's kids are more interested in being on Facebook, Twitter, texting, being on the computer and messing with electronic gadgets. 12 year old girls today are less interested in "dollhouses" as they are in wearing long dresses and bows in their hair or hats like their 1910 counterparts did.

I don't believe for a minute the style of furniture will make any difference there, it's a changing taste of the generations and the internet and electronic gadgets are the new "dollhouse" they play with.

The very young ones seem to still have an interest.

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Warren Barnard

{Really?  (the lifesized contemporary junk) that looks like someone threw it together in 5 minutes in a factory in China out of a slab of particle board with fake plastic wood "veneer" glued on top,  and four square legs thrown on it and being called a "contemporary coffee table" is holding the dollhouse hobby back because of the lack of miniature copies of this thoughtless, boring, factory produced cardboard box-like junk we have today?

I had no idea!}

 

I love your way with words, I do agree though :D :D :D :D :D :D :D  made me laugh

 

 

{I do not like contemporary, modern anything because it just looks like boring,  cheap, thrown together junk made with a minimal effort- and it is, that's why you can buy a "wood" table and set of  chairs at Menards for $199.95 for the whole thing- it's machine pressed cardboard called "particle board" covered with a thin fake wood grain covering.}

 

Come on, it's your right to not like contemporary or modern but to suggest that it is all to the description you used is a little short sighted and I believe wrong. Yes there is all of that, as their has been for every period of manufactured furniture, but there has and still are craftsmen, artisans and designers who create great furniture that moves, inspires, and makes life, our homes and work places better to be in. No it doesn't come from Menards, It comes from people who have a passion to make things better, like the people on this forum. ;)
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  • 2 weeks later...
Liz Mcinnis

I'm happy to see a young person interested in the hobby. With more experience, her pieces may get better. Even if they don't, she may find a market and good for her. I don't like velvet paintings but some people do - and that fact provides income to velvet painters. I also don't mind that she's asking for help to fund her dream. No one has to help her if they don't want to and the fact that they have seems to indicate that they like what she does. Good for her and good for them.

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