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Glues - archival quality favourites?


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Hello everyone,

 

I'm a miniatures newbie and would like to start my first room box on the right foot, so I'd prefer to use archival quality glues.

 

I'm interested in your recommendations for tried-and-tested glues for use on wood, paper, fabric and mixed media.

 

Thank you for any advice.

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Wm. R. Robertson

Sorry to take so long to answer but I have been up in Castine at GS.

There are so many glues it is hard to say. What I do know is it is very important that all joints be both mechanical and glued, in other words joint, pined, mortise and tenon, etc.

One thing is to use things that have stood the test of time, I use either hide glue ( the oldest type ever) or Elmer's carpenters glue for woodwork. For hardware I use Devcon 5 minute epoxy. I use very little super glue..... For paper and mounting needlework I have used "yes" glue...... It is a silk fat type glue.

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Thank you, this is helpful.  I'm glad you reminded me about pinning for strength.

 

No problems with the YES paste yellowing over time?  I seem to recall reading on a couple of blogs about that problem, but I'm not sure if was only when used with paper.

 

One more question, if I may - any suggestions for what glue to use with foam board?

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Wm. R. Robertson

I have never had "Yes" glue yellow any paper, I used it on the wall paper in Twin Manors hallway a photo of which is on the forum.

As to foam board, I have only used it for temporary displays which were thrown out after use.... So I have no history to report. For that sort of thing I use spray contact like Scotch Super 77.

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  • 2 months later...

We use hot melt hyde glue for certain things at work, especially antique wood that originally used that and which needs repair or restoration, but also for gluing leather, felt, rubberized cloth and sealing wood.

 

Hyde glue is an old standby in use for hundreds of years, antique furniture, pianos etc all used it, and restorers use it for these items today.

 

The real nice thing is, if you need to change, readjust, remove a hyde glued item it's reversible with a little heat and/or water, you also do not need to remove the old glue remnants to reglue something because heat and water freshens it again like new unlike modern resin glues which will not stick to previous glue residue.

 

I have more faith in durability and longevity  of hyde glues than any modern epoxies, duco cement, resins etc.

Some advantages are that you buy it in flake or powdered form and it keeps in that form indefinitely, when you need to mix up some you mix up what you need with a little water in a double boiler type arrangement and can control how liquid or thick it is by the amount of water you add.

When done you unplug the hotplate or whatever heat source was used and the remaining glue hardens up in the pot- ready to be remelted and used at any time.

It doesn't have a very long "open time" which means it starts to set up as it cools, but keeping the item warmed and using hot damp washcloths extends the working time.

Once the glue cools completely and the water dries out it's good and solid.

Some may not like the odor of the glue when it's in the pot melting, but I don't find it objectionable and certainly not "fumey" it has an odor, or odor level if you will  somewhat like wet cardboard.

 

I can't stand the smell of epoxy, the smallest amount usually fills the room with it, and I have seen epoxy fail pretty quickly and pretty easily, I have had Duco Cement and contact cement  fail too.

I've often used plain white Elmer's glue for many things and it always worked well, even for gluing a broken in half 600 # concrete sculpture, it held together using Elmer's glue.

I would use  hyde glue, with ELmer's glue a second runner-up for many craft/wood/felt/cloth type projects. PVC-E glue is very tenacious, we use that at work on strips of felt, but the stuff is flexible/rubbery and it's almost impossible to remove since once cured  it doesn't simply sand off wood or disolve

due to it's rubbery properties, I've had to sand into the wood to remove the stuff when something like felt was glued in the wrong location on a board by accident.

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Thank you for all the info on the hide glue Randall, I have never tried it but would like to experiment with it.

 

Sure thing!

 

Here's some instructions that are handy, while it shows a commercial made electric glue pot a small double boiler on a hot plate works the same- a container set inside a larger contain that has water in it so the heat from the heat source is not directly in contact with the glues' container keeps the glue from getting too hot or burning.

As you use it you can keep the pot covered with something as the heat will evaporate the water out, you do have to periodically add a little water to put back what does evaporate.

 

http://www.leevalley.com/us/newsletters/Woodworking/4/6/article2.htm

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