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1910 Popcorn Wagon


Bill Hudson

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PART 3: MAKING THE WHEELS This is the rear wheel of a popcorn wagon that is being restored by Pearson's The thing in the hub is a hub nut wrench, the wheel was being removed at that time. Look clos

This is how I go about making the decorative metal parts such as the sun burst and now the C details, for the popcorn wagon, from nickel silver stock. (1) The parts are drawn up to scale and glued to

Elga, this progression is a shortened version of one I have on another forum. That reference was from about six years ago. If I calculate correctly I am in my 12h or 13th year on this project. It is a

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miraclechicken

I could not be more riveted (pun intended) to this incredible project! I am so thrilled to be able to see all this and hear your telling of it all. Your leaf springs are gorgeous, the brakes, mind blowing. Everything--- I am in total awe of this intense, incredible....words are inadequate---

--LInda

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  • 2 weeks later...
purplejuliana

thank you for posting this... the detail and history is amazing..... sorry I never had the opportunity to take one of your classes.

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metalchips

Hi Bill.

 

I am so glad to see that you are back in the shop and working on your Cretors. I have admired this build since I first saw it on the wagon site. I just found this site so I will follow your progress here.

 

Cheers

 

Tom 

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  • 2 months later...

Holy Guacamole!  Oh man is this ever spectacular!  And to see all the stages and the drafts...thank you for the treat of watching you make this project.  Great photos too. 

 

In Awe,

 

Althea

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Warren Barnard

A craftsman at work, From the way you write you are loving this project even though there a days I'm sure you want to throw it in the bin. Thanks for sharing it with us on this forum.

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  • 4 months later...
Bob McGinnis

Bill ,  Thank you so much for this great kindness you are doing for all of us by showing each little detail of so many challenging parts of this monumental task.     I know it takes a long time to make each little part, but then to take so many photos of how you do each of them and explain in detail each process and share all of this is truly remarkable and very much appreciated!

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  • 9 months later...

Wow.  What craftsmanship.

 

Please, what torch are you using for such fine soldering?

 

Thank you so very much for sharing your incredible work.

 

 

Cat

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  • 8 months later...
WeekendMiniaturist
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This is one incredible post - and I was wondering if there were any updates to the project... I know life gets in the way, but your fans want to know what is happening!  As I've now had three encounters in the world of metal at Guild School, I have even greater appreciation for the skill that I am seeing in these photos.

5481 views - probably the forum's #2 topic after #1 Tinware Tutorial?

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
Bill Hudson

Back at it.  I could not just let the project lay in drawers any longer. There are several reasons I set this project aside but mainly I hit a wall.  I had been fighting paint on breast and it was winning.  But most of the problem was the brass frames. When I first started this project I felt silver soldering the joints was the way to go.  As I handled and worked on it I found that the brass had annealed from the hard soldering. The frames would not keep straight, would warp out of shape.  My first thought was to rebuild the frames using soft solder but them I priced the bears angles only to find that one piece of 1/8" x12" cost as much as a half dozen did twelve years ago when I first started this project. the cost of rebuilding the frames with new brass was pout of my pocket book and then I would have to deal with painting the brass.  so In the middle the night I cam up with the idea of using wood for the frame and sheathing.  (It was my original design when I conceived doing this project way back then.  So now I will bore you with fabricating the frame and body from wood. I will keep some of the metal parts just for the strength of them.

Well I'm off to a good start, got duplicate pictures and can get two them deleted. 

wood frame - 1 (1).jpg

 

To make the frame angles I fabricated them up from bass wood strip. I copied the plans fro the frame and mounted it on the base board and covered it with wax paper. I dug out my little Preac saw and put it to use cutting the angles to lengths.  

 

 

wood frame - 1.jpg

wood frame - 1 (1).jpg

wood frame - 1.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist

I'm looking forward to watching the progress.   Now... about the figurative wall, I'm glad we have the forum.  It is a great place for us to discuss our road blocks in the creative process.  I will have to study soft and hard soldier differences. 

Still learning...

 

 

 

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Bill Hudson

I worked in sudio until after 1 am. Was building the back frame and just about done when I found I had the measurements all off. There was really no way to fix it but to tear it apart and start over.  I worked all day to build the new frame. I have removed some of the metal parts, from the metal frame that support the front fittings and undercarriage and have fitted them to the new wood frame using JB Weld. Now it has to sit over night to cure. Then I will remove the frame from the fixture and install the skin on the outside. I will use 1/64" model plywood for the skin. Then I will cut out the openings. The lower left frame is where the peanut roaster will be installed, the lower center will be where the pulley is mounted to turn the clown and peanut jar. The lower right panel is where the boiler will be installed. The front window is part of the chamber for the popping machines.

2 wood frame - 1.jpg

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Bill Hudson

 I finally got the frame assembled and the skin applied. Tried the windows frames and they fit. The next order of business will be to cut the openings and fit the boiler and peanut roaster. Then sanding and priming. Maybe tomorrow.

rear - 1.jpg

rear - 1 (1).jpg

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  • 4 years later...

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