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jaka44

Some More Paintings

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jaka44

These are all reproductions after Albert Bierstadt, George Inness, and Thomas Moran.  I'm still trying to figure out the best way to paint the frames.  I've got an airbrush now so that helps with control, but choosing the right paint has been tricky.  Water based paints swell the wood and the enamel paint I just got seems to stay tacky.  Nothing can ever be simple.

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WeekendMiniaturist

What brand of paint are you using? 

It helps me if I cut an enamel with a good brand a thinner, and of course the weather has to be low humidity, and NOT windy so I can spray.  This only happens during working hours and Monday - Friday.

The paintings look great!

 

 

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jaka44
11 minutes ago, WeekendMiniaturist said:

What brand of paint are you using? 

It helps me if I cut an enamel with a good brand a thinner, and of course the weather has to be low humidity, and NOT windy so I can spray.  This only happens during working hours and Monday - Friday.

The paintings look great!

 

 

For the paintings above I used Rustoleum Professional Enamel Flat black in a spray can.  The paint itself is great.  Dries and cures fast, tough,  etc...the problem is the spray from the can is completely inconsistent and comes out of the can too fast.  I tried decanting the paint and airbrushing it and it came out too flat.  I could try decanting a satin black and see how that works.

I also bought a tin of Rustoleum Enamel flat black, used acetone to thin it (which is what the manufacturer suggests), and it dries tacky.  Maybe I'm being impatient.  I've looked at hobby enamels such as Humbrol, Tamiya, and Testors, but they're pricey for the amount of paint you get.  Any suggestions?

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WeekendMiniaturist

I like the paints that are made for airbrushes in the hobby stores.  The folks that sell the paint indicate the pigment is finer.  I think you will be happier with your results with the airbrush if you use one of these brands.

In life size projects, we have painted a small molding with ordinary Behr Paint (from Home Depot)... with a standard size  spray equipment.  This was a normal size molding (that was small) that I was using in my life size office when we did raised panel type design and we were trimming it out.  I could use this same profile molding in my miniature rooms as crown, if the ceilings are tall enough, it isn't out of scale. 

I still have testors floquil paint;   If I am spraying basswood, I use a sanding sealer first.   I'm very pleased with the finish.  It is a huge difference in the results for me. 

I recommend purchasing a bottle of hobby related paint any of the brands you mentioned, and try it. 

I will have to switch to a new brand once I run out of my stash.  I will probably try Testors Acryl Model Master first for painting windows or trim for miniatures because it is readily available at my local Hobby Lobby.  I haven't looked at Michaels to see their inventory.

The nature of enamel paint (oil based) requires more drying time vs, acrylic paints, but water based acrylics do require a primer to help them 'stick' or wear better.    At least I generally expect acrylic paints to be water based.

Keeping an airbrush in ready to use condition is challenging for me, so that is another reason I don't try to push normal pigments for life size projects though my airbrush.

 

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

For some reason, I thought Rustoleum was the parent company of Testors fwiw.  They really recommend acetone for rustoleum? yes, I can imagine that would be sticky.  (Can you tell I haven't read the back of one of those cans in a long, long time?)  I don't get along well with any spray cans of paint or finish - I do my best to avoid them, as a spray can is the fastest way for me to ruin a project. 

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jaka44

Yup, acetone is the solvent part of the paint (I think).  I've ruined so many good frames by either messing up the finish or through experimenting with different methods.  As of right now, the actual oil painting is easier for me than finishing the frame.

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WeekendMiniaturist

http://www.rustoleum.com/~/media/DigitalEncyclopedia/Documents/RustoleumUSA/TDS/English/CBG/Stops Rust/SRT-02_Stops_Rust_Enamel_Brush_TDS.ashx

I think this is the technical data for your paint.  I know it says to use 15% acetone to thin, but acetone just seems sticky to me when I rub it over a painted surface.  Are you using the enamel for a specific reason, ie from an artistic perspective?  When I think of any paint that I purchase in a can, it is just too thick for the fine finish I want to create for my miniature endeavors and acetone just evaporates.  When I take nail polish off, I use acetone, and the stuff is sticky - not good for fine miniatures. 

For safety purposes, If you are committed to enamel, the spec sheet says it is mineral spirit based, so call rustoleum and ask them WHY they say you thin acetone vs mineral spirits.  I have only limited experience, so for safety purposes I do recommend you call before you try it.

My rule of thumb is that paint must pour like water before I use it in my paasche air brush.  If the viscosity of the paint is not like water,  I won't use it with an air brush.   If you can find the Krylon short cuts in a bottle old stock, this is the viscosity that I am referring to.  (Krylon is a Sherwin Williams product.)

If it were me, I would switch to a different paint.

 

 

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jaka44

I'm using oil-based paint because I've found any acrylic or water-based products swell or raise the grain of the wood.  For the paintings above, the finish is STRONG.  I can take my finger nail and scratch at it and it won't come off.  It's also sandable and you can buff it.  I tried using mineral spirits as a thinner and found the paint dries to a softer strength; it scrapes away easier.  I did get a better test run today with the Rustoleum.  I might not have shaken the tin enough during earlier tests which caused the over-tackiness.  Thanks for your replies. :)  

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