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Guy Gadois

Log Cabin

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Guy Gadois

Hello everyone.

Was overseas for a year. I had no ability to stay in touch with emails and barely had access to the internet. Anyhow, I did have time to build a 1:16 scale log cabin. It is constructed in the same manner as a full scale cabin would be. Half-dovetail notches on the logs and chinking troweled on between them. I enjoyed most of the processes except applying and ageing the shingles. About 2000 of them. My next project will be something which has no shingles!

The pictures are of the cabin pasted over some background image.

Cheers, Guy

 

Log Cabin.jpg

Log Cabin24.JPG

Log Cabin25.jpg

Log Cabin26.jpg

Log Cabin27.jpg

Log Cabin28.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist

The overlay of your structure to the background creates a nice effect.  Did you build this overseas?  The reason that I ask, is that I can't seem to get anything done in my own home workshop, I can't imagine doing a project of this complexity if I wasn't home... I guess like my friends who winter in FL, you could have two workshops.  

The detail is beautiful.  I am especially fond of dovetails. 

3 hours ago, Guy Gadois said:

My next project will be something which has no shingles!

Priceless!  I am fascinated with aging shingles... I went through all my miniature magazines to read about how the Thomas' aged their structures and I'm pretty sure I have the article on weathering shingles...  I would enjoy reading about your aging shingle experience.

Tamra

 

 

 

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miraclechicken

I love it! Very warm and home-y, Nice job---

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Guy Gadois

@WeekendMiniaturist,

I started the project before I left the country and finished it after I returned. I will post a close-up pic showing the shingles and the tool I used to age them. It is an onerous process but necessary if one is ageing the building. The only shingles I could find were for 1:12 scale and my scale is 1:16, so I had to trim each one to the appropriate size.

Thank you for your kind comments.

Guy

@Miraclechicken,

Thank you, glad you like it.

Guy

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ElgaKoster

A lovely little cabin Guy, I like how your logs dovetail together.

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jaka44

Awesome!  I've watched a few episodes of Barnwood Builders on DIY network and they dismantle and erect buildings of this style so it's neat to see in miniature.  Is the stone work for the chimney real too?

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Catherine Ronan

It is really wonderful! I would love to spend a weekend in side that cabin. ;-)

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Guy Gadois

@WeekendMiniaturist

The tool I use to age shingles is pretty simple. It is a cut-off wheel attached to a Foredom rotary tool. I use a cut-off wheel because it cuts a very fine line. I just randomly course the wheel over the shingles. I then float a dark grey wash over all the shingles and selectively darken some with Copic markers.

Cheers, Guy

 

Shingle Tool.jpg

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Guy Gadois

@jaka44

The stone work on the chimney is made from stencils provided by http://www.craft-products.com/contact-information.asp . David Bromley is the owner and has many different style and size stencils for brick and stone along with many other products. There are videos of how the stencils are used.

Cheers, Guy

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WeekendMiniaturist

Thanks Guy for the response on the shingles.  I have so much to learn about weathering structures.  Is there a plan for the structure?  Is 1:16 scale for live steam trains? 

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Guy Gadois

@WeekendMiniaturist

You're welcome. Yes, 1:16 is one of the live steam scales. I chose this scale years ago in order to fit a model into an existing space. I have no plans for the cabin except for it to collect dust, and, building models like it does keep me out of the pool hall. 

Cheers, Guy

 

 

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Natalia Frank

A wonderful project and looks very realistic. I couldn't believe it is scaled. Is it possible to see the pictures of the interior?

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Guy Gadois

@Natalia Frank

Thank you Natalia. I am researching cabin interiors and haven't started on the interior yet. The roof is removable so I will be able to finish the interior when I can.

Cheers, Arlen

 

 

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MeezerMama

Very, very nice.   All the little details are so realistic.   I look forward to seeing what you do with the inside.

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kstranahan

I love this cabin!d I would love to  chink the little log cabin I've been working on, but  I am at a loss for what the best material is to use for the chinking.  What material did you use, please?

Kathy

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WeekendMiniaturist

I am looking forward to Guy's response on the subject of 'chinking'.  I had to look up the term.  In miniature, could you use the substance they use to chink in a life size structure?  Before this detail emerged on the Fine Miniatures Forum, I would have tried to color grout (used for tiles)  from the hardware store.

 

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Bill Hudson

Chinking of old cabins was done using materials available in the area. Basic is mud, sand and clay. Usually some kind of fiber, such as grass or straw, was mixed in to hold it all together.  In 1946 (housing shortage) my dad purchased land with an abandoned log cabin on it. The cabin was well over 100 at that time.  The bark had been left on the logs when it was first but. Some where in its life some one had nailed pieces of boards and bark slabs over the joints. Most had fallen off or rotted so we chinked it ourselves. My dad dug a shallow pit  and mixed dirt, red clay from up the hill and straw together with water.  Us kids stomped around the pit to mix it all up. We kept the mixture at a molding condition and packed it into the joints.  

 

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Mesouth

In Louisiana the chinking would have been “bousillage,” a combination of local clay/earth and Spanish moss, which grows in our live Oak trees. It was not only used in log cabins, but in between milled boards and sometimes plastered over. 

Bill, I love that your Dad let the kids stomp the mix! My kind of guy!

Martha

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