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CarolynDenning

Dog Trot House

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CarolynDenning

In the early days when Americans were moving into Texas and colonizing it, one of the types of houses built in the southeast part of the state were called dog trot houses.   There usually were 2 rooms on each side connected in the middle by a open breezeway. One side would have a sitting room in front and a dining room behind it. The other side would have 2 bedrooms. The front bedroom would be for the parents and maybe a cradle in it. The smaller bedroom was usually for grandma. There would be a porch along the front and usually back. A fireplace on the front room on each side. There would be a ladder or narrow staircase in breezeway up to attic where children slept. I've seen a restored dog trot house that was decorated in period furniture (early to mid 1800's).  My idea is to make the house and have the roof just sit in place so it could be lifted off to see into the 4 rooms. Making this house is on my bucket list of projects I'd like to make. 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Carolyn, I like your project.  I can definitely see the advantage of having an enclosed structure.  Perhaps, you could make the structure so the walls can be lifted when you want to show someone the contents.  I admire people who are so committed to appropriate period furniture.  Did you take lots of pictures of the restored dog trot house?

The name, "dog trot" is very interesting - there must be a good story that goes with the name of the house... yes?

 

 

 

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miraclechicken

This sounds like a fun project!

p.s.

I have a one room log cabin, hand made by someone before I was born. It is smaller than 1:12 sale, but the roof lifts off. I was fascinated by it as a child. Now it is home to my prototype Hitty doll and Miss Hickory.

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CarolynDenning

Tamra, the idea of the roof setting on it was so it could be removed to see inside. And yes, I took lots of photos. The term dog trot came because these houses were on farms and they usually had dogs who stayed on the breezeway area or dog trot. The house is only about 25 miles from where we now live. I plan to go back with my tape measure!

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Gail Geiger

Hi, Carolyn. This would be a fun project. I love American vernacular architecture. I can imagine your roof as a weathered corrugated metal and the house sitting on piers made of bricks. 

 

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CarolynDenning

Bill, I haven't decided what to build it with yet as I need to plan it. The Barrington Living History Museum referenced in the Wikipedia article is the house I visited. 

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WeekendMiniaturist

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anson_Jones#/media/File:Anson_Jones_House.jpg

Is this the house?  I didn't know that there was a President of Texas.  I am always amazed at the things I learn because of our scale miniature hobby.

I think this is a great historical project.

Tamra

 

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CarolynDenning

Yes Tamra, that is the house.  The Republic of Texas was its own country for 10 years after winning its independence from Mexico until it decided to join the United States and become a state.  There were 5 presidents during this time and Anson Jones was the last.  Because Texas was a country before it was a state, Texas is the only state that can fly its state flag at the same height as the American flag.  Many places in the state you will see the 2 flags flying side by side and you'll hear people saying it's "because we can!"  

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Mesouth

Carolyn, This will be a great project. Like the dog trot style, many plantation homes and farm houses in Louisiana had a large central hallway that ran the length of the house to aid in airflow.  It was not as open as the breezeway in the dog trot, but usually had large doors at either end that often stayed open.  Rooms were open to the hall on either side and often open to each other, again, for airflow. Windows along a front and back porch were very large double hung windows that went all the way down to the floor, so that one could walk out onto the porch.

I think the research before the build is so much fun!

Martha

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ElgaKoster

This sounds like a very interesting build Carolyn, looking forward to seeing your dog trot house develop.

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