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Turning a brass oiler
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19 posts in this topic

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

This is my progress of turning a brass oiler. I start with 1/4" brass rod.  To turn the tapered spout I first step turn it.

 

 

Then using the hand wheels fine tune the taper. I free hand turn as I feed the tool with the feed wheel I back off with the cross slide wheel.

 

post-35-0-27780800-1436917962_thumb.jpg

 

Then I use the same wheel manipulation to form the body.  First a series of steps then smooth the high spots with the tool manipulated with the hand wheels.  I do not use gravers. I have been using this method for many years and fine it easier and faster for me.

 

post-35-0-66556200-1436917975_thumb.jpg

 

Then the whole oiler is finished off with a fine file and wet to dry paper.

 

post-35-0-09014300-1436917999_thumb.jpg

 

The oiler is then reversed and held in a collet while I recess the bottom.

 

post-35-0-70614100-1436918013_thumb.jpg

 

And the final product with the spout slightly bent. 

post-35-0-87605400-1436918025_thumb.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist    200
WeekendMiniaturist

That is a wonderful project Bill, and I'm looking forward to trying this someday.  Did you bend the tip with jewelery pliers?  the kind with rounded ends?

 

This is a great project for intro to metal turning...

 

Thanks!

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

I used clock maker's pendulum adjusting pliers.

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miraclechicken    171
miraclechicken

Nice, Bill---

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

​I'm not sure I would offer this as a introduction to turning class.  Turning the fine tapered spout is quite challenging. Your tool must be very sharp and right on and a delicate touch must be used.  If not the fine tip will climb on top of the tool and destroy all your hard work.  Destroying several in attempts to turn the taper quickly eats up the brass rod stock. (speaking from experience). Once I learned to coordinate the two hand wheels I was finally able to cut the long rough taper and then finish it off with the second fine taper.

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ElgaKoster    524
ElgaKoster

Very nice Bill, and I find it interesting that you use the hand wheels to do the final shaping on your piece.

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

Very nice Bill, and I find it interesting that you use the hand wheels to do the final shaping on your piece.

 

Well Elga,  I did not know about gravers until I met Bill R. so I learned to do it this way. For me it is actually meditative.  It requires my mind to be concentrated just there and no where else. If my mind wanders I will screw it up every time. There is just something about turning brass, the feel; I feel each wheel working as I adjust them to the shape I am turning.

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Bob McGinnis    13
Bob McGinnis

Thanks Bill,   You are always so kind to help.  

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WeekendMiniaturist    200
WeekendMiniaturist

I was thinking that using the two wheels on cross cutting slide is like using an etch a sketch. 

 

If an oil can isn't a good intro to metal turning, what would be good rudimentary exercises in metal turning?  Should we start a new topic?

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

I was thinking that using the two wheels on cross cutting slide is like using an etch a sketch. 

 

A good description. ;)

 

If an oil can isn't a good intro to metal turning, what would be good rudimentary exercises in metal turning?  Should we start a new topic?

 

 

Tamra

 

Probably the most popular exercise is turning a brass cannon barrel.

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WeekendMiniaturist    200
WeekendMiniaturist

Our sons played with one of those cast iron toys with a cannon barrel when they were young.  I have no idea where that item is....for a miniaturist do we attempt to miniaturize it to the proper scale? or do we attempt to duplicate it at the present size? 

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

Here are some simple cannon drawings. They did not scan well but the information is there. The scale bar is in 1' increments.

post-35-0-23748800-1438917816_thumb.jpeg

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WeekendMiniaturist    200
WeekendMiniaturist

Thanks Bill for posting this example.

 

Oh goodness, how would I drill the inside of the cannon out?  I have a drill bit that I use for pen turnings, but do not know what is required for brass cannon.  I think this would be a very challenging first timer project.... hmmmm...so much to learn!  I think I could manage the outside dimensions.  Do you drill the inside last?  It would be my instinct to do the outside turnings first, then drill the inside, but I could imagine that the inside is tapered too to flow or be similar to the Outside dimensions.

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson

:rolleyes: Tamra the bore is straight, just like a gun barrel, it would blow up if the bore was larger at the back end. .  I would Hold the blank deep in a chuck and bore (drill) out first and then mount the muzzle to a live center. To start with I would probably go for small scale, maybe a couple inches long. Any metal cutting twist drill would work.

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WeekendMiniaturist    200
WeekendMiniaturist

Oh goodness... it is a good thing I'm not in charge of making guns.  <shudder>  I am not a pistol packing kinda lass... my only gun is a lead crystal pistol paperweight...If I have to carry and /or learn about guns, it is time to change my environment - but I am willing to turn a cannon barrel...

 

As you can see I've been living a sheltered life - my only dangerous activities are letting me loose in a fabric or fiber store and letting me play in the woodshop with all those saws with motors.

 

Nice links Elga, where do you find all of these links?  I think Youtube is amazing!

 

Thanks -

 

Tamra

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ElgaKoster    524
ElgaKoster

Pleasure Tamra...where do I find the links...I normally do a Google search, in this case I typed in turning a brass cannon...this was the results, the youtube links usually pops up first, next I clicked on images, I find that an image search takes you quicker to the type of websites you are looking for.

https://www.google.co.za/search?q=turning+a+brass+cannon&client=safari&hl=en&source=lnms&sa=X&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAGoVChMIo9vf6MGZxwIViFo-Ch0uqQRY&biw=1024&bih=649&dpr=2

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WeekendMiniaturist    200
WeekendMiniaturist

The ReStore produced a fine specimen life size oiler for me today.  It was my $4 find of the weekend.  I can now reduce and try this project as I have something to measure!  I think this one is a kind of tin, as it doesn't feel heavy enough to be steel... but I will make my miniature of brass; and once I clean out the life size oiler, I will replace it with cutting fluid and it can remain as part of my bench.

Tamra

 

 

 

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Bill Hudson    720
Bill Hudson
On 8/7/2015 at 9:45 PM, ElgaKoster said:

Tamra, here are youtube videos on turning a canon, part one and two

 

 

Discussion from another forum

http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/showthread.php?2721-Model-Cannon-Project-(lots-of-pictures)

And this one from 1798...just for fun :-)

http://www4.ncsu.edu/~kimler/hi322/Rumford-boring.html

I don't know what to say about this that would be positive. It is a very long, crude way to build it with a really crude end result. This could have been turned on a lathe is far much time with exact scale detailing.

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