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karincorbin

Miniature carbide router bits

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karincorbin

For those who are not aware of them the Amana Tool company makes router bits specifically designed for 1:12 scale work. They have a 1/4" shank but they used to be available in Europe with metric shanks.

 

They are beautifully made bits created with precision. They are nothing like the router bits made for the Dremel, this is a whole different class of tool way far above the quality of those. They are expensive to make which by necessity is reflected in the price.

 

The link is to one of the dealers of the miniature Amana router bits "Tools for Today". A good company to deal with that offers good service.

The carbide router bit profiles available as sets or individual bits.

http://www.toolstoday.com/c-371-miniature-router-bits.aspx

 

They also carry small sized detailing CNC wood carving bits and also small sized metal and plastic shaping bits for CNC

http://www.toolstoday.com/c-371-miniature-router-bits.aspx

 

And CNC bits for metal and plastics

http://www.toolstoday.com/c-523-aluminum-steel-plastic-cutting-cnc-router-bit-sets.aspx

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jaka44

Hi Karin, I would love to see examples of the trim work that can be done with these.  So if you have any pictures that would be great.  Since there are hardly any quality mini picture frames readily available, I'm thinking I'll have to buy this set eventually.  Do you think 4070 and 4030 would be useful for constructing picture frames?

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WeekendMiniaturist

I need to make some molding and raised panels for my Guild Study Program Overmantle with Alison Ashby class from Chicago.  I finally got the roombox cut yesterday.    I would like to tap into the forum's experience.  I would think the Amana router bit is better quality than dremel router bits?    I have some small router bits, so will try them first, but curious about how much usage someone gets from the Dremel vs. Amana router bits?  Eventually if I run 600 feet of crown molding in miniature, the investment seems to be reasonable.

As of now I'm planning to run molding with a normal router set up in a table, as I have purchased some bits locally for ogee molding, and will try this on some basswood for painted moldings and cherry if the room will be stained.

I think, though, that I will have to set up the dremel router to manage raised panels though, as my preac saw does not tilt.

I would appreciate any input from the forum as this will be my first attempt!

 

 

 

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MeezerMama
23 hours ago, WeekendMiniaturist said:

will try this on some basswood for painted moldings and cherry if the room will be stained. 

I know this isn't what you're asking about, but you might consider poplar for your painted moldings.  It routes beautifully - much more cleanly than basswood - and it's cheaper and easier to get. 

Also, on the raised panels - remember that when you route them two of the four edges will be end grain and will be difficult to stain consistently.

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WeekendMiniaturist

I was thinking I need a mill that has a table that can be angled to create raised panels, or (heavens!) I move mill's cutting config off from 90 degrees.   This causes nightmares, so I think I will find a way to use a table saw or router...

I haven't really decided how to make raised panels; I will work on it after the floors.  Seems like a great excuse to buy another accessory, but I'm trying not to shop.  Hopefully, the floors shouldn't cause too much havoc.

 Yes, I can definitely use poplar, we have plenty of poplar; it is up high on the rack and seems rather odd to be up on a ladder by myself, moving 8'-12' boards off a rack to get to the poplar, though; it's definitely a 2 person job.

I would most likely use Cherry for anything that is natural wood, because I hardly ever stain cherry.  It ages on its own with light, so I only finish it with oil, but an excellent reminder about end grain.  I have never made raised panels before, and there are so many ways to create them, but finding the right bits seems like a treasure hunt.   I did join tools today's email list... more temptation!

 

 

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Re-reading the post Karin indicated the quality of these bits are much better than dremel.  I will have to make some decisions about which ones to purchase.  I would really like these to be without that ball bearing at the bottom, so will consult with husband on this one.

 

 

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MeezerMama
On 8/7/2019 at 8:37 PM, WeekendMiniaturist said:

I was thinking I need a mill that has a table that can be angled to create raised panels, or (heavens!) I move mill's cutting config off from 90 degrees.   

The Sherline mill head can be angled, and it has a key/keyway to return it to 90 degrees without having to retram it.

A simpler solution, however, is to make a wedge-shaped holding fixture for your panels and use a standard overhead router setup.  

 

EDIT:   You could try a 110 or 120 degree countersink bit and use it like a chamfer bit.   Check out MSC Direct for some possibilities.

Edited by MeezerMama

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Bill Hudson

Sherline sells a tilt table txt can be used some many other tools such as a drill press. Less expensive would be to cut and stack two boards the same size and fasten one end with a butt hinge. 

tilt - 1.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist

Thanks to both of you for the help with this raise panel puzzle.  I have a Taig Mill.  I know I can use Sherline Chucks on my Taig Lathe, but can I use the sherline table on my taig mill?

I knew I wanted that tilting table!  I am very indecisive about these raised panels; it is very strange feeling, but I keep thinking that I will be happier using my micro mark tilting arbor table saw.

I found a couple of 1/4" shaft router bits in the stash, and am combing through the Amana Website.  I really am committed to using a router and making my own moldings though as I want all the moldings in the house to be consistent, some rooms the moldings will be painted and some rooms I will want wood, so I know I must have matching moldings.

Oh, I don't need 500 - 600 feet; I was thinking feet in life size measurements and forgot to reduce it by 1/12th - oops... the GSP Overmantle room measures about 20" square, not 20' feet square.  Perhaps tomorrow is the magic day where we are able to get some poplar off the gorilla rack.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MeezerMama
On 8/12/2019 at 7:22 PM, WeekendMiniaturist said:

can I use the sherline table on my taig mill?

Probably not without modification, but the modification would be very easy.

The T-nut slots on the Sherline are (about) 1.5" apart.  On the Taig they appear to be about 1" apart.  The base has clearance holes drilled in it to line up with the slots.

You could easily remove the base from the table, put three 10-32 bolts/T-nuts in one channel, slide that into your Taig lathe to ensure it's parallel to your table, and then drill another set of holes at 1" spacing.    I suggest you use a center finder to get the correct Y distance (i.e., 1").   X dimension doesn't particularly matter.

One other consideration is whether the head on your Taig mill will rise high enough to clear the tilt table/vise.   It probably will, but you should check.

 

 

 

 

IMG_8211.jpg

IMG_8210.jpg

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MeezerMama
On 8/12/2019 at 7:22 PM, WeekendMiniaturist said:

I keep thinking that I will be happier using my micro mark tilting arbor table saw.

One more thought.  Be *very* careful doing it this way.  The saw blade tilt is degrees off of vertical, so your panels are going to have to be vertical when they pass over the blade.   Think about how you're going to hold them - think custom sled.     And DS turner's tape is your friend!

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