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jackofalltrades

Newbie in Upstate NY

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jackofalltrades

I'm a retired model maker with a small home shop. 

 

My areas of interest include small boats, trains, machines, furniture and any interesting subject.   I am just beginning to explore model horse drawn vehicles.

 

My models are designed using Rhinoceros 5 solid modeling software with Flamingo rendering software and Rhinocam 2 CAM software.   I work mainly in metal, wood and plastic using both manual and digital methods and occasionally farm out laser cutting and 3D printed patterns.  When I need multiple metal parts I often make spin-cast pewter parts.

 

The attached picture is of a 1:8 scale model of a 1920 Waterman C14 outboard motor.  Parts are cast pewter and brass tube and rod along with a few stock fasteners.   I made about 50 of these.   These models were made before I went digital.

 

I hope I can learn about areas I lack knowledge in from forum members and am willing to share my experience with others.

 

Jack

post-479-0-09829400-1415751609_thumb.jpg

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miraclechicken

Very interesting and wonderful motor of course all the digital talk is foreign to me, but interesting just the same :)

 

Linda

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jackofalltrades

Linda,

 

Thanks! I looked at your web site and enjoyed seeing your work!    

 

Digital is only tools, like drills table saws etc.  not a be all end all!   I still enjoy the manual skills of model making.   Computer design and machining only removes the tedium and drudgery from big projects.

 

Attached is a picture of my first commercial miniature.  All done by hand, no digital,  100+ copies.

 

Keep up the good work!

 

Jack

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Wm. R. Robertson

Hi Jack, I looked at close ups of your models on some other sites, neat stuff. I have always like those old motors... Use to have a British Marine on my canoe, it was too big for it. Anyway looking forward to seeing more of your stuff and hope we'll all learn a little something along the way.

BTW, I don't know if you use Cerrobend, but this guy had a pretty good deal on some.... Like a ton of it!

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/tooling-parts-accessories-sale-wanted/cerrobend-158-casting-alloy-293608/

Bil

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WeekendMiniaturist

Great looking motors.  Do modelers make motors that work?  ie, so I can power the model boat in the water?  I don't think it would be good to have battery operated remote controlled boat, because of the water and electricity mix.    All of these modeling skills in the forum are incredible.   I have always wanted a gas powered motor for a scale car; to see if would have a longer duration of using the model;  The engineering around making a scale model engine that would work is mind boggling for me.

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jackofalltrades

Bill,   I have a brick of cerrobend that I use for work holding.   I cast a tin/antimony/copper alloy called 92/8 which is supplied in ingots.

 

My  models were way to small to make operable.    Historically, the Japanese K&O company made some nice 1:9 scale electric operated toy outboards.

 

Glow and ignition operated IC model outboards have been made but they are pretty expensive and large scale.

 

Jack

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Bill Hudson

Years back my friend the late Bill Roy and I first ventured into casting O scale kits using cerrobend.  Really not the best metal to use on a large scale situation. It is better for holding awkward shaped parts while milling or turning; that type of thing.  We soon got a lot of flack from our buyers that while they were using lamps to help dry the paint the metal melted.  Even the heat from lamps while being shown at shows caused distortion.  It is good for kitchen casting of say tin soldiers of heavier bulk but not for any thing with fine details. I eventually bought industrial air/spin casting equipment  and vulcanized our own molds and did our own casting.  

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jackofalltrades

Bill has it correct that Cerro bend or similar alloys aren't suitable for casting parts to be used in miniatures.  Tin or zinc alloys are suitable for spin-casting.

 

Cerro bend and similar alloys are great to use as tooling though. 

 

Jack

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Wm. R. Robertson

Interesting this introduction has drifted into a discussion of cerrobend, oh well, that's the fun about forums.... They are "we" want to talk about.

As for cerrobend not being good for casting parts I would have to disagree, just look at Charlie Bromer's castings. He had C. H. B. Models years ago, they did 1/48 scale machine tools and other narrow gauge railroad stuff. I will say hands down, his casting were the best I have ever seen!

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Bill Hudson

Sorry about your thread getting hijacked Jack. Perhaps the Cerrobend/casting parts can be cut and pasted into Metal under casting title.

 

 

Charlie got us started in casting. Bill Roy was having some architect in NY doing our casting at first. We were casting very fine, thin details which did not hold up under lights.  Charlie recommended the air/spin casting to us.  We changed over to tin-lead metal and later to a lead free pewter.  

 

The 1/4 : 1 Slip-tongue logging high wheels (model below) was the first kit I produced. This model was cast of tin/antimony/copper alloy.It can be built as a working model. The cerrobend, wishbone bar would sag under its own weight.  I ended up making an RTV mold and hand casting replacement bars in tin/lead metal using sling casting method.

 

Cerrobend does do a good job of capturing fine detail and if heat and fine parts that might sag it an be cast right in your kitchen.

 

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Close up of the model latch mechanism. 

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jackofalltrades

Casting Cerro-bend can be good in terms of detail but its high price, grain structure causing it to be brittle and low temp issues convince me that it isn't suitable for casting a product.  Tin/antimony/copper and tin/antimony/cadmium/lead alloys are far superior in terms of physical properties AND if cast properly in properly designed molds, will reproduce detail.  

 

Casting, as with any other craft, requires knowledge and skill to produce a good product.   I started casting tin/antimony/copper alloy also referred to in the trade as 92/8 in 2002.   I was amazed at the detail I was able to reproduce even as a novice following basic casting methods.   As I gained knowledge and skill my castings improved.  I'm always willing to share basic knowledge about casting.

 

Jack

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