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Bill Hudson

Tinware Tutorial

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Bob McGinnis

Looking Good Bill !     You sure don't waste any time.    Thanks for showing us.

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Bill Hudson

I stopped working on this at 1:40 am.  Pat had to remind me that it was way past bedtime.

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ElgaKoster

Who wants to go to bed when you are having fun! Looking forward to more on the lunch pail.

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Bill Hudson

The pail I chose to makes the what I call the "double decker" although the body is one piece. I do not have any measurements of it but I do have some for different designs of single height. I felt my first attempt was too tall so I shortened the bottom half by one scale inch. I also tweaked the former for more accuracy. I'm fairly happy with the results.

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Bill Hudson

This is my attempt to make the little shelf pan that fits inside as s divider.  A can be seen it is not accurate fit and will not really stay in place. So it is time to revamp my design.

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Bill Hudson

The first hardwood former turns out to be not accurate.  I could not hold the tight tolerances. I redesigned the former, made it a little smaller. Being metal I can hold the tolerances better and can form the metal tight to the former.  This allowed me to have cleaner solder lines requiring very little solder clean up. The body made on the metal former is on the left next to the former. It is much cleaner looking

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MissyBoling

Thanks for the tutorial on soldering the wire to the edge. Looking forward to seeing the finished lunch box!

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Bill Hudson

The new metal former works well and is repeatable. I have made eight bodies today and all are very close in measurements. These  have not been cleaned up yet.

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Bill Hudson

A time out from development to build yet another sprinkling can.  This is the start of it, a little different design.

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WeekendMiniaturist

This is one smokin' hot tin tutorial with 6180 views this morning.... wow...  :rolleyes:.

 

I am going to have to chase down some tin!  I wonder if I see scrap metal at auctions if it is something that I can identify as tin.  I think I can easily identify aluminum, and identify steel, but I am wary of scrap metal because I don't know what  am looking for.

 

That watering can is a necessity to keep the plants happy!

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson

Stick to the hobby (K&S) tin. It is the easiest to use. It is consistent and easy to solder.  If you can find it use 50-50 solder with stay- brite as a secondary solder.  The new lead free solder (tin) does not flow as nicely as needed. Maximum 30 w soldering iron. I buy the cheap 30 w soldering irons and file the tip to a point with three side flats. Dip the hot iron in the solder paste (it will smoke) then load with solder to tin the point. Keep a wet sponge handy to wipe the iron occasionally to keep the tip clean.

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WeekendMiniaturist

What are the properties of the 50/50 soldier?  I need to go to Radio Shack to purchase some electrical - terminal-blocks... at least I think that is what they are called... I want to get a few supplies in case they close my local store...

 

I looked at RadioShack's website... they have a 60/40 Rosin Core Solder, a lead free solder with no know ratio, and a 62/36/2 Silver Solder... would any of these work?

 

After reading Wikipedia, I am thinking 50/50 solder would be tin / lead and I would probably find this in a hardware store, instead of sourcing it in an electronics store....

 

I'll look up Tin from K & S too from a mail order source, as I've never seen this in my local train store or at Hobby Lobby.  I have a train store just a couple of blocks from home...

 

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson

You may have a problem finding 50/50 (50 tin - 50 lead.  The flux is also very hard to find. Stained glass supply houses still carry it for doing leaded glass. When I mail you your sprinkling can I will send you a CARE package  50/50 wire too.  I have 25 pounds of the stuff which I will never use in my life time. I have done all of this last run of tin and have only used about two inches of it. I use the fifty fifty because it darkens better than stay-brite or silver content (radio solders) solders. Did you double check with the train store to see if they were just out of stock?  ( I have been doing business with my train shop of 69 years) I find it hard to believe they do not carry it as it is a common item for model trains.  Check K&S prices + shipping to having them order it for you.  Usually when I order from out hobby shop I save on shipping. For personal reasons I do not do business with Hobby Lobby. Flux core is useless in tin work.

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Bill Hudson

For several days I have been developing a former die to make the coffee can for the top of the lunch pail. The coffee can is just two deep formed pans soldered together face to face. The top half will eventually have the coffee cup on it.  I was some what concerned that I might be pushing the depth of the pan and would get tear out. That didn't happen. These two are the first tin runs. I still have some fiddling to do to make it work better.

 

Well after all this work it turns out that the pieces are a little too large to fit nicely into the top of the lunch pail body so I will have to remake the forming die.

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ElgaKoster

It looks great so far Bill!

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WeekendMiniaturist

It is amazing to see how you form those pans... I would have imagined some very expensive machinery and press & die setup.  I called 6 hobby shops in 2 counties, no tin locally.  I can order locally, they would need to me to take all 12 sheets... it is interesting that 3 of the 6 didn't answer their phone calls... hmmmm... and no answering machine.  I think this is a mail order item! 

 

Mail order is fine, after all I need to purchase some wire, brass, and styrene too...

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson

I do not really have expensive tools for metal. Probably (other than lathe and mill) the shear cost the most  ($150) from harbor Freight about ten years ago. I just pulled my hydraulic press out of storage and started using it.  I got it used for $20.  

 

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Bill Hudson

A little bit more on forming.  I thought it would be nice to post a bit of progress about making dies; kind of a hit and miss but enough to give an idea how to make them. I do hope this is of interest here.

 

First is making what I call the ram part of the punch. I made this from CRS (cold rolled steel) scrap.  I had to mill it true.

 

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The die punch, the male part of the die that impresses the pattern into the tin. This is also scrap CRS. It is cut to near size.  I laid out the profile of the ram onto the underside of the  punch and punch marked the corner locations so that the ram and the punch line up. Then I epoxied the two together being careful to keep the alignment.

 

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The punch assembly is then clamped in a vise on the mill and trued up (squared) around the edges.  It is then drilled, counter sunk and tapped to 4-40 for cap screws which are below the top surface. The punch is now machined to the inside dimensions of the tin pan to be punched.

 

 

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Bill Hudson

Next comes making the former base and forming cavity.  I used scrap (hard) aluminum 3/8" thick plate.  Cut two similar sizes and then epoxied them together. The edges were trued up and all sides were milled square to each other. I drilled and tapped 6-32 holes on the corners to hold the two plates together.  I separated the plates and scrapped off the epoxy and applied layout die to the top surface of the bottom plate and then screwed the plates together.   I used lay out die on the surface and then laid out the dimensions of the forming part of the punch (the smaller part). I scribed lines inside the lay out and established the smaller corners, laid out from the corner the radius of the still to be used. The corners were accurately laid out and punched.  All was clamped in the vise and corner marks were accurately located with a center finder then the hole was drilled completely through the plates. Not the two round bars on the vice. These help keep the former elevated to keep from drilling into the vise.

 

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Bill Hudson

 The completed former world fine. It fits inside the pail body but it really is not deep enough to be used as the coffee can top parts and is too straight sided. In the middle of the night I had a brilliant idea. Remake the first punch to fit this base and it worked beautifully.  Now I can form the top parts and also the little pie  tray that foots inside.       ( the screw holes in the brass mean nothing except that they were there in the piece of scrap I used)   :P

 

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The pail lightly stacked together to get and idea how it will look. The coffee can top will be trimmed where they are to be jointed and the coffee cup will be smaller. The little tray will be wired and I will put some kind of handle on it so it can be removed.

 

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ElgaKoster

Very interesting Bill, thanks for sharing, looking forward to seeing the lunch pail completed.

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Bill Hudson

Very interesting Bill, thanks for sharing, looking forward to seeing the lunch pail completed.

ME TOO!

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MissyBoling

Thanks Bill! This is better than reading a good novel.

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Bill Hudson

It is getting closer.  Below are the results of the last five days making and adjusting forming dies.  Still need cleaning up and better fitted.

 

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Just a reminder of where this is going.

 

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