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Bill Hudson

Tinware Tutorial

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ElgaKoster

Lovely work Bill!

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Bill Hudson

More tin ware under development on my bench.  I have had a mini rush on orders for my tin ware. Keeping me busy.

The first picture is of several projects under construction including a plastic box with extra tapered spouts. The little cone shapes will be the lamp filler as seen in the background. The other pieces are 1930s kerosene cans and deluxe sprinkling cans with wire bail and wooden handle. 

 

Below that is my attempt at galvanize look with out using paint.  I used fine grit in my air eraser for that look. These are yet to be aged.

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WeekendMiniaturist

I like the shiny cans and the air eraser cans... oh how do you choose?  I think Shiny has caught my eye.  I would have never thought of using an air eraser... I think I have a badger set that I found very inexpensively, just thought you use it to etch glass, but now I know of another application. 

 

Delighted to watch this tutorial!

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson

Beyond the 1900s shiny tin would not be authentic in most cases, especially vessels such as sprinkling and kerosene cans, it would usually be galvanized .  The little lamp filler could be shiny and still authentic as that design goes way back into possibly Colonial times. Up until the 1930s or so tin was imported from Europe to the US. Tin then was actually iron sheet dipped in tin. It had to be dipped several times so the tin plating was uneven and in stripes or have runs and would not have been as shiny as the new tin..  Tin now days is mild steel electro-plated with tin coating.

 

Air erasers were designed to remove (erase) paint or ink from art work.  Usually they are not powerful or heavy enough grit to etch glass effectively (might fog it some). Usually a regular sand blast gun would be used.

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Bill Hudson

Tamra,  I guess I will have to eat my words.  In ordering new compound for my air eraser (dropped the bottle and spread the compound and glass allover my floor). I find indeed it can be used to etch glass. I have not had much luck doing so but then again I am using Co2 as a propellant rather than a noisy compressor. Co2 doesn't get up to high enough pressure 45 − 60 psi,  to do glass. Probably why it didn't work well for me.

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Bill Hudson

More tinware.  More kerosene cans and a start on a coffee pot.  The first two pictures show my method of holding the cans while I solder the pot ears on them. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hef

Thank you ever so much. I am just starting and at the moment I am like a spounge taking in all the info that I can, but it all looks exciting and daunting at the same time. It looks like I will have to become an engineer as well to make all the jigs. Thank you for all the time effort and the generosity with your knowledge.

Thanks Jenny

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Bill Hudson

Hi Jenny, welcome to the forum.  It would be nice if you would take the time to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about you. It helps us understand where you are coming from when we answer your postings. 

 

If you want wire sopped wheels you ail have to make them your self. At present I think I am the only one who was making wire spoke wheels for miniatures. I believe I gave some instructions on this forum on how to make them try putting wire spoked wheels in the search.

 

Bill H.

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Bill Hudson

A new addition to the tin ware portfolio.  Coffee pot with lid and tin cups.

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WeekendMiniaturist

Bill this is one well-liked, multiple viewed thread on our forum.  Thank you for your generosity.  This is encouraging me to learn more about metals.  I especially like the lip on the coffee cups.  The lipped edge appears to be rolled, and that has me puzzled... is it indeed rolled?

 

Surely your turned the knob on the lid of the coffee part... I will enjoy seeing how you finish it...

 

Has anyone been working on some metals in progress as a result of this info?  If yes, then would they start a new forum topic for their tests?  I am assuming the application of your generous info can be shared in the forum, but you are a hard act to follow!   You have so much equipment, that I do not even know where to begin... I'm bummed, I don't even have a metal brake, but I do have a set of metal cutting shears that I can "borrow" from the hubby, and I have soldering tools... so I can do something!

 

Is there a list of tools, a. minimum requirements and b.  nice to have - but not absolutely necessary?

 

I was on Gerald Wingrove's website last night, and he said to start with something simple.... so dear Master Miniaturist, what is the something special that we could start with on our forum?  I know we start with the item that speaks to each of us...

 

and I'm  still liking shiny watering cans this morning - makes me want to go outside and add some water to the flowers, but nature has been taking care of that for me...

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson

Bill this is one well-liked, multiple viewed thread on our forum.  Thank you for your generosity.  This is encouraging me to learn more about metals.  I especially like the lip on the coffee cups.  The lipped edge appears to be rolled, and that has me puzzled... is it indeed rolled?

 

​*  the lid is just fabricated. go back to page 17 to see how I made wood blocks for forming dish shape.  The ring; just make a ring to fit inside the top of the pot and solder the joint to hold it.  Tin the inside of the lid, tin the bottom edge of the ring and carefully lay the ring in the upturned lid. Hit it all with a light torch flame. The ring will solder in the lid.  Yes I turned the knob on the lid.

 

Surely your turned the knob on the lid of the coffee part... I will enjoy seeing how you finish it...

 

Has anyone been working on some metals in progress as a result of this info?  If yes, then would they start a new forum topic for their tests?  I am assuming the application of your generous info can be shared in the forum, but you are a hard act to follow!   You have so much equipment, that I do not even know where to begin... I'm bummed, I don't even have a metal brake, but I do have a set of metal cutting shears that I can "borrow" from the hubby, and I have soldering tools... so I can do something!

 

​For a metal break use a butt hinge. File one edge to a taper of about 30-45 degrees. leave the other one flat.

 

Is there a list of tools, a. minimum requirements and b.  nice to have - but not absolutely necessary?

 

​Go back and read the firs of this tutorial. No special tools are really needed. 

 

I was on Gerald Wingrove's website last night, and he said to start with something simple.... so dear Master Miniaturist, what is the something special that we could start with on our forum?  I know we start with the item that speaks to each of us...

 

and I'm  still liking shiny watering cans this morning - makes me want to go outside and add some water to the flowers, but nature has been taking care of that for me...

 

Tamra

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Bill Hudson

Today I will show you how I make the rolled handle for the sprinkling can. The pictures speak for themselves.

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Bill Hudson

Shall I continue with this tutorial or is there already enough information and demos? What is missing?

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ElgaKoster

Bill, I don't know if anything is missing...but I have thoroughly enjoyed looking at everything you showed us here. One day when I want to make pots, pans, kettles etc for my dollhouse kitchen...I will definitely come back and probably read everything a few times before I attempt making any of these items.

I am sure your tutorial will be a great resource and inspiration to us for many, many years!

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MissyBoling

I would love to know how to do a fine rolled edge at the top of a cylinder. I want to make some pots and pans. And ditto what Elga said.

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Bill Hudson

I would love to know how to do a fine rolled edge at the top of a cylinder. I want to make some pots and pans. And ditto what Elga said.

 

I cheat, I solder a wire around the top.  Will show you later when I finish a bucket.

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Bill Hudson

This is a Shipfitter manual for the Navy. I have had it for many-years and is the main source for developing tin work both full-size and miniature.  

 

Questions were asked about wiring around the top of tinware. Below is from the manual. 

I have tried this method in miniature with less than quality success. First of all the tin I am using for minis is .010 thick. Not too much thinner than full size tinware. When rolled the roll comes out looking obviously out of scale.

I have not had time to wire some of my buckets but when I do I will show the progress.

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Bob McGinnis

Bill,   Thanks for all the little tips you keep coming up with.  It is so much enjoyed and appreciated.  

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Bill Hudson

How I wire the tops of vessels.  Since trying to roll this tin over a wire is not easy and ends up out of scale this is my method.  I solder 26 gauge bead wire around the top.  

 

First off I clamp an end of the wire in a vise and stretch the wire about an inch.  This straightens out the wire and hardens it.  The wire is wrapped around a dowel of smaller size that the actual piece to allow of spring-back. the wire is then clipped into rings.  Then the wire ring is tacked to the cup with a bit of solder. I lay the cup upside down on a smooth surface (not metal) and continue to tack the wire to the cup top. Once the wire is completely around the cup I run the tip of the soldering iron around the wire and cup side to fill in the solder.  Then it is just a matter of cleaning up excess solder. I file off the edge inside of the top so it isn't sharp (so you won't cut your lips when you drink from it). 

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miraclechicken

Thanks for the step by step. It looks great!

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Bob McGinnis

Thanks so much for showing how you do that.   That is very clever way !   

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Bill Hudson

Test run using scrap metal to see if my new former, for a new project, works. I am fairly happy with the results but it still needs some tweaking.

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Bill Hudson

The beginnings of a lunch pail. The harder parts are still ahead of me. I have to form the coffee container.

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