Jump to content
Bill Hudson

Tinware Tutorial

Recommended Posts

WeekendMiniaturist

Sorry for my late night confusion; the photo of the watering can had a cone shape sprinkler head so I couldn't figure out where the dome shape was used. 

 

Referencing post #54, (I think) tin was used to create your tubes.  What is a recommended source for tin?  I will attempt to download and print the beginning booklet, as I'm having difficulty reading it online.  I've experienced that things I think will work, ie lacquer thinner from Lowe's isn't my best option in terms of quality outcomes in fine miniatures; it is better to purchase lacquer thinner from the woodworking store or to find it in an automotive  paint store; so wondering if tin at the hardware store is / or is not the recommended source of supply for tin to make a tubes. I have also been frustrated with my draw plate.  A miniature friend gave it to me from our club; but it doesn't work as easily as I imagined for dowel rods, and I've never tried using it for metals as it was probably intended. 

 

If only I had worked in a machine shop for the last 30 years, instead of sitting in front of a computer...

 

B)  at 2544 views this morning this seems like a very popular thread.

 

Tamra

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Tamra,

 

It does look like cone in the picture doesn't it.  Sometimes the camera sees things differently than the eye.  

 

For tin I use the stuff from hobby shops, it is usually K&S.  For drawing you must lube the heck out of it.  Also drawing by hand is not very easy.  I am 6' 4" and weigh over 250; even so it was difficult for me to pull the tin.  You really need access to a draw bench with a winch on it; which will give you a powerful straight pull. There are special pliers for use in drawing. 

 

If you decide to do tin ware, I hope you will make your own designs and patterns. 

 

I have never been a machinist or worked in a machine shop either. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob McGinnis

Thanks so very much Bill for doing this Tutorial. It has been very interesting, informative. It is much appreciated. Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WeekendMiniaturist

I'm 4'11 and probably shrinking as I age.... and I'm not going to tell anyone how much I weigh.  ah, it is nice to know that it isn't just me having an argument with my uncooperative draw plate.   I looked up photos tonite of draw bench with a winch, will be on the lookout.  I was using pliers to draw my dowel rods. 

 

 

Good!  There is hope for the rest of us, who do not have any life experience in a shop; there is a lot to learn about metals, I'm so much more at ease with sawdust and fibers, this thread will have me stepping out of my comfort zone wondering what I can apply to my next project. 

 

hmmmm... metal watering cans. I know I've got some old ones around here too...

 

 

Tamra

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

You might try a bucket first.  Maybe one of those tall flower buckets that flower venders use.  Do a half dozen of those and you will have good practice. Then you can fill them with mini flowers or set up a flower shop window in mini.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

More tin work.  This time an oval shaped sprinkling can showing how I mounted the top and spout.

 

post-35-0-03731700-1421541047_thumb.jpg

 

The top edge of the body is filed to a bevel on the outside edge then fluxed.

 

post-35-0-01254000-1421541071_thumb.jpg\

 

The oval stop is cut and dish formed, flux added to surfaces of body and lid.  Then both are tinned with solder.

 

post-35-0-02322000-1421541397_thumb.jpg

 

Then both parts are fluxed again and assembled upside down and hit with the flame of a torch (lightly) until the solder flows.  

 

post-35-0-83099300-1421541088_thumb.jpg

 

The edges of the newly soldered on top is filed flush with the body.

 

post-35-0-87383900-1421541100_thumb.jpg

 

A hole is drilled in the bottom at an angle.  Flux is added around the hole, inside and outside.  The spout is also fluxed and pushed through from the inside and is solder tacked with a sizable amount of sold at the inside bottom of the spout. Then the spout and body is hit with a torch flame until the solder is drawn through and forms a fillet.

 

post-35-0-87013800-1421541113_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
miraclechicken

Thanks Bill, love these posts. As you post, I print and it reads like a book. I am very lucky to have this access to your knowledge---

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElgaKoster

Thanks for the photos Bill, it gives one a good idea on how to approach a project like this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

The wire mesh I had the can setting on upside down ( in the fourth picture up) is part of a tripod frame I just recently purchased. It came from Rio Grande and it comes with the screens.  Not very expensive and very handy.  I was able to hold the can upside down and heat it from under so that the whole top was heated evenly.  That made the solder flow evenly. 

 

post-35-0-30066200-1421642197_thumb.jpg

 

post-35-0-70455800-1421642208_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

If you do have questions about "tin work" Please do feel free to ask. I will either answer them here or start a new thread on the subject.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Continuing along with this project, oval can.  The three cans are simpler cans with out fancy handles etc.  The three cans are what I have gotten done so far but they still need the sprinkle screens installed, cleaning up and aging.

 

 

post-35-0-04278500-1422139509_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-35-0-37991300-1422139521_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

I recently posted a nice fancy bench organizer.  Those things are nice if you don't want to work. Just show off your organized bench. I tried things like that and found I was spending ore time taking out and putting back which is just a pain in the @ if you are trying to get something done. What I have found working best for me is just a few small plastic paint buckets.  Pliers etc just fit over the edge an other tools store inside. Other odds and ends are in sorted piles of same like stuff and are reasonably handy.  

 

 

post-35-0-44119700-1422139827_thumb.jpg

 

 

I am running out of tin projects to continue this tutorial.  If any one has something, tin related, you would like to see here please let me know by Messenger.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

​Here are the three the simpler cans in post 86 plus three more of their siblings I have just finished. These were painted with cold galvanize paint, given a dark wash of India ink then given shading and rust treatment using poster chalks.

 

post-35-0-17546900-1426566277_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-14220500-1426566635_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob McGinnis

Bill,  I have learned  much  and really like all you have put into this tutorial Thank you very much for sharing all this with us !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Back to more tin.  This time I am making kerosene cans.  A Fairbanks-Morris 1909 can and  more modern one from probably the 1930s.

 

This is my start on the latter one.  I have used a full size one I have in my collection as an inspiration.  This one has a screw top on the filler hole.  You might be able to see that the top had knurled edge around the top. The top is not soldered on to the body at this time.

post-35-0-65222300-1429830747_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-19556100-1429830761_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-08014200-1429830774_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-69133300-1429830785_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

This is the start on the Fairbanks-Morris kerosene can.  Both cans are co-builds. 

post-35-0-24013000-1429831576_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElgaKoster

I really like your screw on top Bill! So cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

This is the can so far, waiting to be aged and have the bail and handle made and installed.

post-35-0-32469100-1430221037_thumb.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WeekendMiniaturist

And... this is the can that goes with the beautiful box...it is aged so well... wow.

 

I also liked your comments about a neat bench.  I'm not guilty of having a neat workbench.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

​Starting a new experimental project: a locomotive oiler in 1/12th scale, patterned after a 1908 Fairbanks oiler.  This is all hallow, has a brass filler cap.  It id still in not finished stages.  I ail probably paint it as it might have been in a shop.

post-35-0-20065500-1431987280_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-96353900-1431987299_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-46853100-1431987323_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-71586800-1431987351_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-40958500-1431987367_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

This is the can in finished and used condition.

post-35-0-65270100-1432074244_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Hudson

Finished another can. This time it is a Fairbanks, Morse & Co 1908 kerosene can.  This time I attempted to give a wet oil look on the top and down the front.

 

Any one looking at this?

post-35-0-52876800-1432247032_thumb.jpg

post-35-0-09624400-1432247048_thumb.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob McGinnis

Yes Bill,

               I am looking at it and totally enjoy your showing all your wonderful techniques in doing so many different things in making beautiful miniature metalwork pieces   I did some metalworking in high school and in vocational school and enjoyed it very much.  But nothing as nice as this.  I really like how you do such a great job of making them look they have been around a long time and well used.  I liked your story about the old beat up shipping crate.   What a treasure of a birthday gift !  Thanks so much for sharing all your knowledge and for the inspiration.  It is very much appreciated. 

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
miraclechicken

I'm looking too. The first can, I have 2 in real life. I use them for lawn mower and generator gas.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...