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Debora Beijerbacht

table cloth in torchon lace

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Debora Beijerbacht

A couple of years ago I spend some time on making lace. Here's a little tablecloth, modeled after a design by Roz Snowden. I made it a bit shorter and added a different stitch in the upper and bottom squares.

 

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detailkleed.jpg

 

I used entomology needles, the finest one possible that are still strong enough to use in this scale.

 

 

kleedje.jpg

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ElgaKoster

I love your lace Debora, did you go for lessons or just learned from Roz's book? I bought bobbins and thread two years ago, made a lace pillow and a practice piece and then just never had time again. Next year when I am finished with a project that has occupied my dining table for the last 18 months, I want to try lace making again, I think you need to have it out permanently where you can work an hour or two every day, it sure is time consuming. Guess I will try learning from the book first...if that doesn't work too well, there are quite a few teachers both here and in Johannesburg and one of them are interested in miniatures too and showed me a bedspread she has started. And oh yes, I love the Spanish role pillow that you posted in the gallery, really wonderful work.

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Debora Beijerbacht

Thanks Elga, initially I attended a two weekly class. It all started when I went to visit Brugge in Belgium. I watched these ladies making lace but their hands went so fast they were a blur. It was simply undetectable to see how they did it. Not that much later I discovered there would be a course at a local community centre so I jumped right in. I soon caught on and took it from there. Once I realized there are only two different 'stitches' (to put it blunt) but it's the sequence and variations of those two that create the different types of lace, books became my main resource. Now I could read the (technical) drawings with far more ease.

 

In the end this course proofed to be a great start to venture into this new technique. I think that with any new skill you'd like to learn the interaction between a student and a teacher is invaluable, and can't live up to learning from books, no matter how great they may be! 

 

And you're right, best thing is to have it out permanently, cos it's so time consuming. But cover it up well with a cloth if you leave it. It seems pets are irresistibly attracted to the pillow, especially cats. Mine loves to curl up on top of all the needles, as if he was a fakir. 

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ElgaKoster

I seem to be lucky with my cats, they never do anything to my miniatures, the one is too old to jump on the table and the other one prefers the great outdoors as a playground.

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bonni.b

I can find #1 and #2 entomology pins - the #1 are .40mm while the #2's are .45mm. I assume I want the #1's?

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ElgaKoster

You get special pins for lace making too Bonni, I bought the smallest one you can get, they are only 17mm long and was recommended to me as the best for miniature lace, I did like that they were so short, here is a website that shows all the different sizes with an explanation for which lace to use them too. Oh yes, the pins are quite handy for other mini uses too, like tiny drawer knobs  :D

 

http://www.vansciverbobbinlace.com/Pins.html

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Debora Beijerbacht

You're right Elga, small needles are definitely useful for other miniature related jobs too.

 

I would like to add that the standard Honiton needles are still relatively thick at 0,4 mm. Size 0 for insect pins is 0,35 mm Already a bit smaller, which is good. But they also come in size 000, which is 0,25 mm. I took a picture so you can see the difference with a 'standard' Honiton pin. 

 

post-10-0-17971100-1398176824_thumb.jpg

 

Try to see if you can source them in your country. I bought these here in Holland but here's the site anyway;

http://www.vermandel.com/productlist.php?action=cat&cid=18

 

I'm not gonna say anything about the length, which I think is very personal. I do prefer a bit of length because it allows me to stick the pins in at various depths. I leave the ones that are there just temporarily, while making the lace, stick out above the side pins at the edges and other essential pins. That way I can easily pick 'm out without accidentally removing one from the side or that needs to stay.

 

Beware that in this scale the pins are cramped tightly together so you have to have some means of being in control.

 

Ooh, and another thing; try to go for the stainless steel ones if you can. If you are working on your cloth for a longer period of time, moisture from the air can affect the needles to oxidate, leaving bad staines in your cloth. No good!

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ElgaKoster

Thanks for the photo, great to see the difference, no they don't sell them here, and I did ask a bug guy...might just buy them off the website and have it send to a friend in Amsterdam, can pick it up there in July, small parcels like that just tend to dissapear in our postal system.

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Debora Beijerbacht

You could do that, or, what crossed my mind when i checked the entomology site, i could buy a few packages for under 3.50 Euro each and post it in an envelope. P&P are peanuts for that. Or do envelopes disappear regularly too??? 

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ElgaKoster

Yes, they do disappear, will send you a pm, they only take direct bank transfers as payment, no credit cards or PayPal.

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Victoria

Debora, what a great idea with enthomology pins!

I just found a website in my area that sells 0.25mm pins. I did used Honiton ones before, they are indeed a bit too thick, especially when you use fine silk or extra fine Egyptian cotton. I'm in a  slow process of studying Bucks point lace, these pins would be perfect.

I found even 0.10 mm, but they are too short :(

Are you planning on making lace again?

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Debora Beijerbacht

Hi Victoria! So nice to meet you up here too :) In answer to your q... I don't know yet. It's a very time consuming thing but then again: aren't most miniature techniques?! I made lace cos I wanted to master it. I do have one thing on my still-to-make list though. An early reticella lace collar. I started scaling down on a general design, but it's challenging to decide what detailing to leave out due to its size, and at the same time trying to stay true to this type of lace. 

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Althea

The lace is beautiful Debora--and I always love seeing pictures of the process-it does nothing to detract from the magic of it or the awe inspiring tininess of the scale but rather seeing how it is done enhances my respect for the craft of it.  Those insect pics are great--for a while I used them as fake knitting needles in basket vignettes. 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Deborah, what is the sky blue "pillow" that you are pinning to?  Is this insulation foam for the construction trade?  I also purchased Roz's books, but I have not even attempted to make any lace, as it looks more time consuming then Petitpoint, and it does not lend itself to letting it sit for 3 weeks and going back, more like you must pay attention to me - every- night- project.  Did you use silk thread?  Gutterman silk size 30 wt?  It is a wonderful accomplishment.  I clearly must purchase a lot more insect pins!

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Brandaen

Debora and Elga ! Hi !!!!

I still have my pillow and bobbins ready but would sure love a basic pattern to play with ;-). Also , love a video ... Hint .

What size and type if thread should I be looking for to do miniature bobbin lace ?

Thanks so much !

Bran

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Bill Hudson

Beautiful lace.  One thing I have not tried yet.  My mom tried to teach me tatting  but some how I forgot what I learned. I think now this would drove me crazy. I have the highest respect for those who can do lace.

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ElgaKoster

Brandean, I am still fairly new to lacemaking myself, there are two nice books for miniature lace making, the first book deals with all the suitable threads etc.

http://www.amazon.com/Miniature-Bobbin-Lace-Roz-Snowden/dp/1861080867

http://www.amazon.com/New-Ideas-Miniature-Bobbin-Lace/dp/1861082193

For videos google beginner bobbin lace, there are quite a lot out there on the web.

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Brandaen

Thanks Elga !

I also discovered last night a lady here from Puerto Rico that does a lace here , Maybe I can get a hold of her ... Language could be a small barrier hmmmm. But us never know . She was written about in the community but she's 92 lol. Bless her heart that's awesome to reach such a fine age !

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