Taig Lathe #2 w/ auto threading attachment
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WeekendMiniaturist

I was lucky to source taig lathe #2 locally and it has an automatic power feed attachment, and what I think is a bypass switch that allows the lathe to go back to manual use.  I was thinking that it would be wonderful to set up a lathe permanently for duplicating.  I would appreciate opinions on the usefulness of the automatic power feed attachment in the realm of 1/12th scale miniatures.   Would you want this accessory?  and how you would you use it?   

I have to remount the lathe, because it has drawers underneath the lathe and is too tall for my use, and if I set it up with a duplicator it will require a different setup for the mounting board, too.   

In my very limited experience I have have always cut my threads by hand, and I don't want to disassemble if there is truly a use for this.

 

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greenie

The power feed attachment is a usefull item on any sized lathe, it allows you to take a long cut without using the carriage handle to crank it along.

The power feed is NOT for thread-cutting, you'll need another attachment to be able to cut threads.

I do not have a Taig, but just looking at pictures of the Taig power feed it's only belt driven, so if you don't want to use it, then remove the belt and try it out and see what happens.

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WeekendMiniaturist

Thanks greenie, but certainly the power feed aids in a consistent thread cutting process, and this was the only application I could think of.   Unless this lathe is CNC enabled, and I am not aware that it is, I couldn't think of a reason to use an auto feed.  I don't think it is CNC enabled, because I do not find any connectors or plugs to attach it to a computer board.  When I google, "threading attachment for taig lathe", Keith Brooks comes up in my search results.  I will look at it, tomorrow, at lunch time if possible.  I think it has little stepper motors attached though, so at the present time it is a mystery.  I purchased it via a local machinist who is restoring equipment for resale.   He acquired it in an Estate Sale, and my original owner is unknown.  

Thinking about it now, it would be nice to be able to machine a maximum length of wood to a specific diameter, like taking a .500 square piece to .450 diameter consistently.  But I've generally would keep a turning on one lathe, so it is concentric to the specific headstock.  At one point I tried to set up operations using the unimat then the taig, and the turnings were not concentric when I moved to the Taig.

 

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greenie

You can get things to run concentric when you change the workpiece from one lathe to another, BUT, you will have to use a four jaw chuck on the second lathe.

The 4 Jaw chuck allows you to push the workpiece around, so that you can get it to run absolutely concentric. If you use a dial indicator whilst rotating the workpiece in the four jaw, this does make it easier to achieve an excellent result.

A lot of trial and error is involved in doing this,------- the old saying of  " practice makes perfect "  comes to mind about now.

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