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I decided to add another Wordpress blog to my site, just for my roomboxes I have been building, I will be adding photos and more to it along with other places I have been posting to about their work  in progress, I find it much easier to upload/share photos in that format since the Wordpress system automatically rescales my iPhone photos whereas to post more than a couple of photos here I have to stop and individually resize each and keep the total file sizes under 1 mb, upload them, and then delete those reduced copies off my desktop- a lot more steps and work unfortunately.

I know I will be modelling and casting 1:12 scale elements after my own very large Victorian and Art Deco architectural sculptures, so  I will be covering that in my blog over time too. My large scale work does not "rescale" very easily, but I am exploring ideas on the technical side of finding the easiest method.

I won't be selling my room boxes, they are for my own enjoyment :)

https://randallwolff.com/miniatures/

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WeekendMiniaturist

In your blog post, you comment... 

I just don’t know if 3d printers are capable of making detail this small.

This has already been accomplished by Alison Davies, in the UK for 3d Printing.  https://www.alisondaviesminiatures.co.uk/... I have purchased other printed miniatures here and there... some high heeled shoes that can be used... still my mind wanders when it is time to finish.  I can finish a piece of wood; I know how to paint and I know how to finish wood, but resin... those items were purchased to see with my own eyes the capabilities of a 3d printer.  It is a really beautiful bed, even my non-miniaturist husband thought it looked great!  (My friend Peggy bought the french 4 post bed home from Kensington for me! )

I would think detail is a function of the nozzle for the filament, and perhaps the resolution of the type of filament to create this detail.  I have a bed and a chair, both have incredible detail.

There is a portion of my miniature self that must be true to history and so that is where my conflict arrives...   certainly the bed is much more affordable and if gives you another option of reality.... will the plastic fade over time?  I know what happens to wood and painted wood over 20 years.  

I admire all of you who are able to maintain a blog or website and work; I think producing a finished fine miniature is challenging within itself!

 

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On 7/26/2018 at 8:55 PM, WeekendMiniaturist said:

In your blog post, you comment... 

I just don’t know if 3d printers are capable of making detail this small.

This has already been accomplished by Alison Davies, in the UK for 3d Printing.  https://www.alisondaviesminiatures.co.uk/... I have purchased other printed miniatures here and there... some high heeled shoes that can be used... still my mind wanders when it is time to finish.  I can finish a piece of wood; I know how to paint and I know how to finish wood, but resin... those items were purchased to see with my own eyes the capabilities of a 3d printer.  It is a really beautiful bed, even my non-miniaturist husband thought it looked great!  (My friend Peggy bought the french 4 post bed home from Kensington for me! )

.... will the plastic fade over time?  I know what happens to wood and painted wood over 20 years.  

I admire all of you who are able to maintain a blog or website and work; I think producing a finished fine miniature is challenging within itself!

 

I'll check that out, there is a difference between printing the plastic items to sell those, and printing master models to use for molds to cast other materials into, the latter is what I plan to do and is what I've done for many years with my full sized sculptures- making a clay model, molds then casting from the rubber mold, and pressing clay in a plaster mold.

The problem with plastics is plastics deteriorate not just from UV/sun exposure, but chemical breakdown over time, plastics first start getting brittle and that's the beginning of the end. Wood should last indefintely if it's kept dry and free of termites etc., other very permanent materials are terracotta, metal, and plaster- UV and age doesn't affect these, but once someone values the metal as scrap more than what the form is- it's in danger of being scrapped, especially if it's gold, silver or a large quantity of bronze, tin etc.

Things like wood v/s resin as far as finishing goes is difficult, because wood takes stains resin does not, so anything made of real wood will have real wood grain and vary in how it takes stain.

The grain itself whether it's wood or part of the surface in a replica made of resin goes a long way towards believability, you expect wood to have wood grain, cracks and knots, so if those textures are replicated on resin it will look like wood with the right paints and techniques.

I have sculptures I molded from antique wood carvings, with a brown stain and different shade of brown paint and some rottenstone, I can make the plaster casts of them look like wood because of the grain texture.

However, that's easy, the hard part is doing something like making a 1:12 scale French carved upholstered chair, or rolltop desk, or any carved furniture out of the minute and thin pieces of wood required to make them!

 

Yes, Allison Davies works are fantastic, that's close to what I want to do- probably not fireplaces since everyone has fireplaces and residence type elements, but I'm more interested in making the elements found on 19th century brick buildings in places like NYC like the attached and related.

My biggest issue is scaling down my large work to 1:12 when I'm so used to working in feet and inches using 100-200# of clay.

The big issue with Allison and Sue is they are in the UK, and we are in the USA here, and the exchange rate $ to £ is about 30%, plus postage is very high, so a £100 order is closer to $130 plus postage, and if you order what you think you need and wind up short, it's expensive to order from the UK.

Allison has use of a $50,000-$100,000  MJP 3600 3D printer, one would have to sell an unrealistically insane number of £25 plaster casts to even break even on something like that!

I bought what should have been more than enough of Sue's cornice molding but I need one more piece now due to having problems mitering the plaster sections, plaster is NOT a good material for making these- far too fragile and installing screws to have a mechanical bond is iffy- one of the sections cracked despite the pilot hole I drilled, resin would be far more practical and can be drilled, sawed sanded and painted easily.

Allison's site says this in part;

"made of a very high grade plaster and not a normal casting plaster."

This is what we call in the states "Dental plaster" it's used to make models for othodontal and dental work,  it's very hard, but like all plaster it can break and chip, problems can happen when you glue plaster to wood- the wood can warp or expand/contract, and either the plaster cast or the glue will break first, whichever is weaker.

"When casting in plaster it is a slightly different process to resin and the hardest job is to eliminate air bubbles. "

It doesn't have to be- a vacuum pump or pressure pot would eliminate air bubbles completely with no herioic measures needed, it's recommended for getting poured rubber molds bubble-free, by putting it in a pressure pot or box attached to a vacuum  pump and leave that on until the material sets, and it's bubble-free when it comes out.

 

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