Duplicator for wood lathe
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Guy Gadois

At one time when I was younger and butch I had a mini-lathe which I could move about if necessary. I bought the Penn State Universal Duplicator which worked quite well. I sold the lathe when it became too much to lift, and purchased the Proxxon DB250 wood lathe. It is very light and meets my requirements for turning miniature columns. I couldn't find a duplicator accessory for this model so I built one. It is about half-size of the PSi one.

Duplicator1.jpg.4ca41715a2e347f4a1b7c9149ae96070.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist

Guy, that is a great looking duplicator!

 

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

Guy, are you able to get nice detail with your duplicator?  I have an anker duplicator, and I am wondering how to sharpen the bit to give me the best results for duplicating?  I want to duplicate an estimated 150 stair spindles to do two levels of stairs and the hallway, and expect that I will have to make more then needed so I can look through the bunch then select based upon the quality of the turnings.  I would really appreciate some advice on the bit.  I do understand how to use the duplicator, what thickness of metal did you use for your pattern?

Thanks -

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Guy Gadois

Thank you Weekend Miniaturist for your kind comment.

In regards to sharpening the cutter bit, it depends on how much detail the pattern has. If the spindles are quite detailed then the cutter needs to be as sharp as the pattern follower.  Usually some light sanding will be required. If the spindles are less detailed, grinding a small radius on the cutter nose will give a better finish. 

I use 1/16" or 1mm  aluminium for the patterns.

Cheers, Guy

 

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MeezerMama

That's really nice work!

 

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WeekendMiniaturist

I hope you will post your duplication results; while I know what it is supposed to do, it all seems rather mysterious to me.

 

 

 

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ElgaKoster

Tamra, I am stayng in the US until after Castine, so I will have my duplicator patterns and cutters that my students need with me in Chicago. I would be more than happy to show them to you if that would help you.

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WeekendMiniaturist

Hi Elga, I will gladly accept your offer in Chicago... I will stop by the booth, as I already know where you will be located.  I am thinking my tip of the duplicator's cutter should be similar in shape as the diamond shape like this...  I will look at the cutters on the anker, and vega duplicators.

http://www.rockler.com/diamond-carbide-mini-turning-tool-replacement-cutter

Tamra

 

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Bill Hudson

The cutter should be the same shape and size (width) as the follower. The Ankor comes with a round tool bit holder.  Use high speed steel for the cutter. Unless you are cutting hard steel you do not need carbide. 

 

Bill

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WeekendMiniaturist

Thanks Bill, it is interesting that these indexable cutters for wood turning are carbide.  I was just trying to reference the shape.  Having looked at your Ankor, the follower and the shape look fine; having looked at my vega, I used some unknown scrap piece of plexiglass for my template (I did a post myself) and that has a diamond shape on the duplicator for my Jet mini lathe.

If it ever warms up around here, I will give it another try; it is probably the user and not the duplicator....

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ElgaKoster

Tamra this is the duplicator that I have and that Pete Boorum sells with the Taig lathe, I think it is the same basic design as the Anker. If you click on accessories in this link you will see how the cutter looks. My husband ground a finer point for me on mine. I needed six cutters for my class, Pete suggested that I buy blank high speed drill bit blanks and grind the points ourselves, I did that as I think that ten drill bit blanks cost me less than the cutter in this link.

https://www.pennstateind.com/store/CML-DUPU.html

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WeekendMiniaturist

Hi Elga, yes, the Anker looks just like the Penn State Industries duplicator.  My Unimat forum members had suggested a Fine Woodworking Magazine, "Making and Modifying Machines" by Herbert Consor, May 1983 and I just received the book yesterday. It has some info in the article about duplicating, too. 

This book is a collection of articles from the Magazine.  There are several wonderful articles in the book; like a DIY panel saw, (if I had room, I would already have one), and shop built sharpener and Making and Modifying Small Tools.  

In reference to tool bits; I sharpened my first tool bits after the first class with Mr. Robertson. We already had a grinding wheel and I bought a rikon sharpening station and added the CBN grinding wheel when I attended the woodworking show last year.  I didn't realize this initially, but the sparks from sharpening has resulted in holy shirts, perhaps this is the reason I've seen leather shop aprons.  I'm not apprehensive about sharpening, I am just wondering what the results will be from my duplication efforts.

 

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