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Upton House Stained Glass Windows
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CollieFeathers

This is a project for the Upton House's doll's house.
https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/upton-house-and-gardens/features/calling-crafters-and-artist-to-contribute-to-uptons-dolls-house

Four stained glass windows done in the old style of painted stained glass.
The first step is to make a drawing of the lead lines and the basic design so that can be traced with glass paint onto a piece of glass and fired in a kiln to make it permanent.

The deadline to finish is tight so I better move along. Did all 4 drawings today. This is one of them.

SGwaindows1igma.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist

Collie Feathers,  This will be fun forum topic.  I know you are bringing a lot of life size experience to this miniature project.  I will stayed 'glued' to the forum!

 

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CollieFeathers

The line drawings of all four windows has been done. Sharpie on acetate. Then they were scanned and reduced to the actual size of the miniature window.

These are very small real windows even in the real stained glass world.

The black tracing glass paint will be put on with the calligraphy pens. It is made by REUSCHE & CO. The black outlined sketch is called a "cartoon". It shows where the lead lines would be. I also put in a shorthand type of sketching for the figures. The miniature windows will look better if I do NOT cut out each piece of glass and "lead" them together. I'm going to trace paint the lead lines in so that all will be flat and square. With light coming through the finished piece (all stained glass windows should be viewed this way) you won't be able to tell that these were not actually leaded.

The trace paint will be fired on the clear glass in a kiln so it absolutely will not ever come off.

SGwindows2igma.jpg

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CollieFeathers

Repairs were done to the real windows. Decided to leave the repair lines IN the miniatures as well.

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WeekendMiniaturist

My brain is telling me that the word "Cartoon",  another word for "pattern" was also used in weaving tapestries. 

As you indicate you have a kiln, are you using enameling techniques?

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CollieFeathers
On 11/5/2017 at 3:55 PM, WeekendMiniaturist said:

My brain is telling me that the word "Cartoon",  another word for "pattern" was also used in weaving tapestries. 

As you indicate you have a kiln, are you using enameling techniques?

Yes! "Cartoon" means "pattern". Interesting that it means that in tapestry also. Stained glass windows and tapestries were basically the comic books of the middle ages. They told stories in "cartoon" form for a people who mostly couldn't read. The churches and cathedrals told biblical stories (and other stories) through the windows. Tapestries might tell tales of battles.

Yes again. I'll be using enamels for the color in these windows. The outlines and shading will be the traditional paint for real painted stained glass.

Fired these last night. These represent the lead lines. These are the thickest lines. Today I'll do the thin lines, fire them again, shade them, fire them again then do the enamels and one more firing.

SGleadlinesigma.jpg

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CollieFeathers

The glass is the 2mm thick glass from the frame bought at the Dollar Store.

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WeekendMiniaturist

If I could go back in time, I would want to see the Rugs in France and and the flemish Tapestries on the looms...  but during the Renaissance period, it would be fun to see the tools they used, and to see how Stained Glass windows were made for Churches or grand Castles...I am guessing that this kind of work was done by Men.  I wonder if any ladies of the court were allowed in the work rooms.  A couple of years ago, I read that famous tool maker Holtzappfel allowed his daughter to use a lathe, and this revelation as of now, is my only find of a woman using any tools... that were not meant for cooking or needlework.  (Although Holtzappfel's lathes were made for Kings and wealthy Lords.)

I am happy to be living in this period of time!

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CollieFeathers

Not a lot has changed from the Renaissance period when it comes to making painted stained glass windows. One thing would be that you can plug in the soldering iron instead of heating it over coals.

Progress on the miniature windows. Fine line work and shading are done. On to the enamels.

SGlineshadeigma.jpg

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WeekendMiniaturist

I have never seen this in miniature before; amazing!  I lam looking forward to the application of the enamels.  What temperature do you fire your enamels (at?), and what is your current favorite kiln.  I have been avoiding the kiln conversation; as it is cold here in the winter, I have cars in my garage, and I do not know where to put a kiln... without adding another whole section to the house... you know that kiln that resulted in a multi-story addition to our home...   

 

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CollieFeathers

The finished windows. To be shipped on Monday morning.

Window4OKigma.jpg

Window1OKigma.jpg

window2OKigma.jpg

Window3OKigma.jpg

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CollieFeathers

Hi WeekendMiniaturist,

Many a cold winter day I have had my hot chocolate while warming myself next to my kiln. All you need is 14 inches space all around your kiln and it will be OK. You do NOT need a big kiln. Some of the smaller kilns use a regular household plug.

The slightly bigger ones like mine use a large dryer plug. I had my kiln in the laundry room and would just switch the plug out with the dryer. You can find them often on Craigslist. Sometimes you can get a bargain. Kilns are tough. Not much goes wrong with them and they are easy to repair.

I fire the glass paints and enamels at a cone 022. Around 1087 degrees F.

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WeekendMiniaturist

Just 14" of space?  that is wonderful.   Now I am hopeful!    The windows are amazing!

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