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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Jumping ahead for a sneak preview of things come. These are the main parts of the cart less one wheel which is still under construction. Every thing is kind os stacked together in these pictures. Once the last wheel is done I will be going to the metalwork to finish it off.
  2. 2 points
    First I made brass jigs to hold the parts while being glued. Shown here is the capital T part. the lower notch is used when making the capital I parts. A blank is placed in the assembly fixture while the upper section is built. Then the lower section is built tome the whole lattice of one window. The little black and striped parts below are inserted to space the leg of the T away from the fixture wall.
  3. 2 points
    I used a standard drill gage. This one is Craftsman but the General ones are also good. You need to draw from the back side as the holes are sharper. Taper the end of the piece being drawn and start with the easiest hole. I stopped drawing before the pice became completely round leaving a flat area. I did not worry about trying to fit the ends to fit the profile of the adjoining piece. At that scale it is not noticeable. I made special fixtures to build the main components in. If you will notice the upper section outer pieces form a Capital I and the lower pieces form a capital T. I made an assembly frame with a removal bottom. to the bottom I glued a drawing of the lattice. I cut apiece of wax paper to fit in it then build the lattice stating with the upper section. Then I build the lower section and fill in. I
  4. 2 points
    Hope every one is enjoying the Holidays and looking forward to a very good New Year.
  5. 1 point
    It is a field Kettle set. What you call a box is a large water kettle. Stored inside the kettle are accessories for making tea and hot chocolate. At this point in time I don't know much more about it. I am just starting to gather information to start developing it. Then I will develop drawings and patterns before even thinking of cutting metal. Once I reach point of sharing I will start a new thread just for it.
  6. 1 point
    A little more: designing and making braces, brackets and rings. Because of the smaller scale I modified the brackets on the side of the cart. The drawings are applied to brass via spray mastic and are then cut out with a jeweler saw. These will be the upright braces that hold the body to the frame. The rings will be mounted on the sides at various places. I will not be making as many as are on the original cart. Some carts do not have these rings or a any of them as on the original cart. I think on this cart they are more decorative than utility. Upon close inspection of the original photos, the side brackets with huge nails are not in reality large nails, just applications fo decorative purposes. Close inspection of the photo shows these are plates with the applied bumps. The plates are nailed to the cart via smaller nails.
  7. 1 point
    I assume you are talking about the fancy brackets. I sawed then from brass stock. This picture is from the original cart. I use what ever material works best for me. The brackets are from brass. The caps on the shafts as well as the caps on the rear of the frame are from tin. I tried to use .010 steel but didn't like the way it sawed and it was too brittle for sharp bends. The bows on top are laminated up from three layers of 1/64" model plywood. I made a form to clamp them in while the glue dried. .
  8. 1 point
    A little more work on the Chinese cart. I have made and added the prop leg under the frame; this holds the cart level when not hooked up to an animal. The picture of the cart with cab is not a picture of the finished cart; the cab is just sitting on the frame for the photo. I am now starting on the iron work, something I really enjoy doing. I love the challenge.
  9. 1 point
    This the lattice in the windows. I made them from 1/16" square cherry drawn round through a drill gage.
  10. 1 point
    I am pleased to learn that Bill Robertson has launched a beautiful website! https://www.robertsonminiatures.com/ He has an incredible history and it is a great opportunity to study these incredible works of miniature art!
  11. 1 point
    Well worth the time to look through. Lots of very amazing miniatures (or trick photography 😉 ) Bill is also sharing some of his secrets on how he does them.
  12. 1 point
    Like I said there are over 500 nails in these of each wheel . I made a drilling jig to fit on the rotary table to his the drilling of the holes. I had a little problem of drill wander in the wood grain. The results are acceptable to me.
  13. 1 point
    Bill, Hi! I'm delighted to see you building. Thank you for the post and these great photos of your work. I look forward to following the project. Patrick Wentzel
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Beautiful! It works just like my RL mahogany table. It also takes just as long to open as yours does and mine only has 1 inset leaf. Isn’t it great to figure out these systems that seem to work well even after more than 150 years. That is an absolute treasure! Idske
  16. 1 point
    This is a wonderful, skillful project Elga! Congratulations!
  17. 1 point
    Three volume set with slipcase Still a few issues to work out but they are getting better I think The Life of Napoleon Volume I: The House of Bonaparte Volume II: The Grande Armee Volume III: Napoleon's Marshals
  18. 1 point
    Kickback happens when the gap between the blade and the fence is narrower at the rear than at the front. They are fussy little saws, it does not take much to have the fence get out alignment and no longer be parallel to the blade. When you notice some kickback get out your accurate measuring tools and check it then adjust the fence back to parallel. Maybe one of these days I will get back to posting on my blog. Years ago I did a whole posting on how to fix and tune up the vintage Dremel 4 inch tablesaws. I also did a posting on fixing a Proxxon tablesaw where the blade was out of alignment with the miter slots on the table. There is no built in way to make that adjustment so I had to slot the hole in the casting for the mounting bolt to allow it to move just enough to put it into alignment. Having spent a lot of time tuning up full size saws I understand about the importance of fences and blades being in true parallel. It can be frustrating and tedious to get it just right but it is essential that you do so if you want accurate cuts from a saw.
  19. 1 point
    I’ve started working on this painting again. I’m going to start glazing to try different things, and working on more details. But it will be over a long period.
  20. 1 point
    Self taught been working on it about 2 to 3 months. Each one is a learning experience as I fine tune my process and materials. I plan on doing a whole series of art books, currently I have two mapped out, Canova and Thorvaldsen, with a Jacques-Louis David in the works, but I plan to do many of the classical artists, focusing on neoclassical and Academic art. Alma-Tadema, Godward, Bouguereau, the list is endless
  21. 1 point
    Tamra, you should definitely use the grr-ripper on your life size saw. When ripping a longer length on my Proxxon or on a full size router table, I use 2 of them in a leap-frog fashion. I really like this tool. So much safer! And you can get a 1/8” add on for thin rips.
  22. 1 point
    Tony posted in our Taig groups.io forum that 2nd edition of this Book, The Taig/Peatol Lathe: and its accessories is now available on Amazon. I have the first edition and found it very useful when I was new with my Taig lathe and now that I am up to the 'basic' user of the lathe I find it more resourceful when troubleshooting. "The Taig Micro Lathe, known as the Peatol Lathe in the UK, is a popular "desk-top" lathe, widely used in a variety of applications from clockmaking and model engineering through to pen-turning and pool cue manufacture. Its simplicity, sound engineering, and rugged design, coupled with a very competitive price, have gained it an enthusiastic following worldwide.In this book, the basics of setting up and adjusting the lathe are covered, and the wide range of standard accessories are described. The later sections describe a range of enhancements that can be made to the lathe to increase its versatility, along with further accessories that the owner can make using the lathe.Tony Jeffree has owned and used a Taig lathe for several years, during which time he has written a number of articles about the lathe and other aspects of model engineering, for Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop magazines." Other versions of Lathe books that I have purchased use the Sherline for reference...
  23. 1 point
    They are readable each one about 55 pages, 100% cotton paper, gilt edges. Each marshal is labeled and has his portrait, each member of the imperial family the same. The Grande Armee features the work of Hippolyte Bellangé The slipcase needs some work next one will be better. I used to have a set of The Campaigns of Napoleon in three volumes with a similar case I think Folio Society did it. Next up a two volume set of Homer using the illustrations of John Flaxman
  24. 1 point
    Oh dear, I can send you some of our heat, looks like we are in for a hot and dry summer. We already have water restictions in place, not allowed to water our gardens or wash cars. I finally finished my Victorian dining room roombox that I started when I was inexperienced and new to the hobby 18 years ago. I will do a post on it soon.
  25. 1 point
    If anyone is interested i have a complete one for sale Bob
  26. 1 point
    Julia, did you have fun at the Guild Show? Your crocheted bed cover looks wonderful, and it provides additional inspiration for people like me, who have never tried to crochet in miniature scale. How long have you been crocheting? The cat looks real! Elga, I am happy to report that I was able to find the soft colored Elizabeth print from the Duckadilly, store. I'm so glad that you posted your photo with this fabric in the background, as I would not have known that it was available in a softer colors. The third purchase has proven to be quite charming! Now I will remind myself to be brave and use scissors to cut and use it!
  27. 1 point
    The class descriptions with photos are available on the Guild's Website... and Guild Members are reporting delivery of the 2020 class catalog are arriving in mailboxes!
  28. 1 point

    From the album: Textiles

    Designed and stitched by Teresa Layman. This was one of my IGMA Fellow submission pieces. The design was inspired from the end papers of a children's book called, "The Lady and the Lion" by Laurel Long. The piece has approximately 2000 French knots per square inch and took about 800 hours from start to finish.

    © 2014 Teresa Layman

  29. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched on silk gauze #40 with one thread of hand dyed cotton by The Gentle Art Size : 12 x 18,5 cm or 4" 5/8 x 7" 1/4 189 x 293 stitches The original is in my summer house along with the aunt Olga's and a chinese one not yet finished in miniature
  30. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Also known among the miniature stitchers as Aunt Olga's carpet Stitched on silk gauze #40 with one thread of variagated hand dyed cotton The Gentle Art Size : 20,7 x 27,5cm (8" 1/4 x 11") 331 x 441 stitches The original carpet is on exhibit...in my summer house ! (inherited from my reknown russian aunt Olga)
  31. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    A collection of non-opening twelfth scale needlepoint handbags by Janet Granger. Some are stitched on 32 count silk gauze, and some on 40 count silk gauze.

    © Janet Granger

  32. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Bolster cushions stitched on 32 count silk gauze by Janet Granger, stitched with one strand of Anchor stranded cotton.

    © Janet Granger

  33. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Reproduction of an antique 18 c. Heriz Serapi in 1/12 scale, approx. 5 5/8" x 8 1/8", 40 count silk gauze, Gloriana silk.

    © Natalia Frank

  34. 1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Corky designed and stitched this delightful bird footstool cover on 60 count silk gauze with a variety of silk threads.

    © Corky Anderson

  37. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched on 40 count silk gauze with DMC threads.

    © Corky Anderson

  38. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Sampler designed and stitched by Annelle Ferguson, the frame was made by Pam Boorum.

    © Annelle Ferguson

  39. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Annelle taught this beautiful piece at Guild School in 2012. The frame was made by Dick Hardy and the brass candle sconces by Wm R Robertson.

    © Annelle Ferguson

  40. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Lisa stitched this rug on 48 count silk gauze with over-dyed cotton threads from Simply Shaker and Weeks Dye Works, the chart was designed by Catherine Buron.

    © Lisa Salati

  41. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Persian rug stitched on 48 count silk gauze by Lisa Salati, the chart was designed by Anne Ritter.

    © Lisa Salati

  42. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    This piece was stitched on 75 count silk gauze, the design was charted by Corky Anderson based on a cushion in the collection of the National Cathedral in Washington, DC.

    © Elga Koster

  43. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched by on 58 count silk gauze from an original Victorian Berlin wool work chart.

    © Elga Koster

  44. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched on 50 count linen, the design was adapted from an antique sampler from 1859.

    © Elga Koster

  45. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Herati rug stitched on 40 count silk gauze with French Knots, the chart was designed by Sue Bakker.

    © Elga Koster

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