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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Finally got around to making a 1:8 scale chair for the roll top desk. Took me three attempts to get it right, going through each hole six times with beige thread. Cheers, Guy
  2. 3 points
    Thanks for the compliments Bill, I think trying to figure out how to do it is more fun than actually doing it much of the time. It took me several attempts just to figure pout the template for drill int the segment holes. Once I got the fixture set up drilling the holes was just taking the time to drill all 500 + holes. The biggest problem was keeping the holes aligned as the tiny drill wanted to wander when it hit hard grain. I solved much of this by starting the hole with a center drill first. I can only work about an hour or so each day so it took me much of a week to drill all the holes. Same to for turning own the nail heads. My lathe is set up for that and locked in position. so ever once in a while when I need something to do I set down at the lathe and turn nails. I'm about 1/3 of the way in finishing the nails.
  3. 3 points
    Searching for a new project, I found a pic online of this camper, so why not make one. It fits on the old stake-bed truck I made some time ago. Cheers, Guy
  4. 2 points
    I worked on some more tonight, most notably the shepherd and some other things. But still more to go.
  5. 2 points
    Thank you Elga. I’ll post another picture now, but I’ll probably not have time to work on it more until this weekend.
  6. 2 points
    Hello! Thanks, Bill for trying to rally us! I, too, have been wondering where everybody is. I have been busy, just not posting. I currently have two “builds” in various stages, a room box that is a large walk-in closet and one part of a condo in New Orleans. I also have my wonderful step back cupboard from my class with Mark Murphy that needs finishing and 2 needlework pieces in process. Then there’s the Plantation bedroom and porch to finish, and ... My list could go on and on! I hope we hear from others, too! Martha
  7. 2 points
    Hey! My name is Karen, and I am the sister of the late Marcia Backstrom. Marcia was a substantial talent in the miniature doll world with her original dolls still being displayed in private collections and museums around the world! Maybe some of you remember her work! Until I am more technically proficient as to be able to add pictures, you can google her name to see some of her fantastic character dolls. In the meantime, I would love to hear from those of you who knew my sister. Knowing Marcia, there are some funny stories out there!!
  8. 2 points
    I had problems locating nails that would work for the wheel sides. I had this antique 1/4 # box wire nails and decided to use them. I have to turn the diameter of the nails down and true them up; all 594 + of them. I set up a collet in my lathe and turned them.
  9. 2 points
    A template was made to mark the hole locations on each segment. A fixture had to be designed to drill the holes accurately. There are 33 holes per segment making a total 297 holes in each wheel. There is a difference in hole spacing between segments so each segment needed to be marked separately but all holes in each line had had to been the same circumference. Nail size and location test on reject blank
  10. 2 points
    Next came turning the hubs. I used An old Magnolia limb I had laying around under my work bench in the garage, for years. I drilled a couple sections and pressed in a long piece of brass tube to mount it in the lathe. I later turned the metal boxes from hex stock steel for the front of the hub (AKA nave in Europe). These will be drilled of the spokes later.
  11. 2 points
    Start on building the wheels. I no longer have a large enough lathe to turn the wheels so I had an adaptor plate made to mount on my rotary table of my Sherline mill. The wheels are made up of 9 segments. That = 40º triangles glued together . These were both mounted on the plate with double stick tape and cut to outside and inside diameters with a mill cutter.
  12. 2 points
    The support piece at the back of my Klein duplicator is made from white/natural colored UHMW plastic, it is not delrin. Not that it matters as they are both slippery plastics. But they do have other properties that are different.
  13. 2 points
    I used steel binding (banding) strap for making my templates. Can cut it with Jeweler saw or use abrasive disc in Dremel tool to shape.
  14. 2 points
    Picture of truck.
  15. 2 points
    Hi, Bill I show two photos, one by accident, on my computer. I'll attach another one and maybe the wheel will appear.
  16. 2 points
    Guild School 2019 still has openings in classes. Some are full, but there are lots of great classes available. Check out the Guild School pages on the website. http://igma.org/guild_school/index.html
  17. 1 point
    Although I learned how to crochet as a child from my grandma, it never really caught my imagination as I found it repetive and boring. Last year I stumbled across a South African designer's full scale afghans and they made my heart sing, they are full of texture and certainly not boring! I have been experimenting with different threads and hook sizes. First up is the Phoenix, I am using Mettler 50wt cotton sewing thread and a 0.5mm crochet hook. In the beginning it was quite stiff but the larger it gets the more I have hope that it will drape nicely. At the moment it is 13mm (5 1/4") square, I plan to make it big enough to fit as a bedspread on a scale double bed. This pattern is called Briar Rose and I am using Venne silk thread from The Netherlands for it with a 0.6mm hook. It is lovely and soft but as the thread splits easily because it isn't a tight twist I don't think I will use it for intricate patterns. And this one is the Atlanticus pattern, for this I am using Mettler 60wt cotton sewing thread and a 0.4mm hook. I was surprised by how much easier it was to crochet with the thinner thread and hook on the stitches that gave me trouble on the pink bedspread. Unfortunately I can't find this thread in South Africa and will have to wait to get more when I visit the US again. I bought the colors I have at a closing down sale of a quilt shop in Houma, Louisiana last year and there weren't many left. For now I will concentrate on finishing the pink bedspread before continuing with the others.
  18. 1 point
    The class descriptions with photos are available on the Guild's Website... and Guild Members are reporting delivery of the 2020 class catalog are arriving in mailboxes!
  19. 1 point
    I am not a purist when it comes to having fun with the scale miniature world. I do have a fussy - historical, mischievous, evil twin on my left shoulder, but my angelic right shoulder self with a slightly tilted halo is generally in control of my miniature world. I have a collection of odd little hotwheel type die cast cars that tend to show up in my here and now miniature world, should I actually finish s-o-m-e-t-h-i-n-g in this decade. (Does the decade end in 2020 or begin in 2020? Good grief, I hope it ends in 2020, or I'm in trouble.) I attended Guild School Classes in 2014-2016 and Guild Study Program classes and is ANYTHING Finished??? The miniature world does not have to be perfectly scaled, especially when it comes to a painting. I've been to a lot of museums and there are some huge paintings in the art world. If you actually painted a miniature of Monet's waterlilies and put it on a table to offer it for sale at a true 1/12th scale, had I not seen it in real life in Pittsburgh, PA , I would have initially thought that miniature is waaayyyy too big... so it needs to fit in an appropriate miniature setting. Large paintings or small paintings, even when I read about the size of the painting in a book, I am always amazed when I see the original work of art, in person. Miniatures as Art resides in the soul of their creators. We, the collectors and We, the artists in the miniature universe have to be open to the Art within us... with painting miniatures, you really do have the best position, you can create at the size you wish and as long as it looks right to the artisan, you have met the criteria of the "Golden Rule", which is simply, its ok to do the math, but trust your own eyes!
  20. 1 point
    If I get back to LA County Museum of Art, I will definitely check to see if the painting is available to see. We were just in Los Angeles last October... Of all the items we miniaturize in the community, I think paintings are on the top of my, "This is Art!" list. I see the goats and I think I see a person? on the left. Miniaturizing full scale items to 1/12th scale requires a lot of skill, some degree of patience is required to miniaturize for our skill, but anything where you decide on color and another example the proper shading in petitpoint, requires a different set of skill.
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    To mark off the spokes to even lengths and keep hub centered in the wheel, I turned a pin that fits snuggly into the hub. I center drilled the top so that the point of a compass can be placed in it to draw the spoke lengths.
  23. 1 point
    Just a teaser. Wheel parts just roughly in place and stacked up to give an idea of what the wheels will eventually look like. I still have to shape the spokes and drive in all the nails.
  24. 1 point
    Another step forward. Finally drilled the spoke holes in the hubs.
  25. 1 point
    I have not stopped on this cart only set it aside while I take advantage of the warmer weather to clean the garage so I can do the work that can't be done safely in the house. Also getting some yard work done. (and working on some back orders). Stay tuned.
  26. 1 point
    Hi, There is a faucet similar to your photo made by Island Crafts. On web site : superior-dollhouse-miniatures.com , it is called faucet with handle, model # ISL 2708. Look under hardware,faucets. Also, ebay is a good source. I would also try Handley House as a source. Hope this helps a little. gail
  27. 1 point
    Some photos from the past of Chinese and Mongolian carts in use. Note they were pulled by a variety of animals. Note also sometimes the cab was covered with a fabric to break the cold.
  28. 1 point
    Jim Hall made exquisite wood furniture in the 70's. From very fancy bombe chests, highboys, and delicate chairs to refrigerators and sinks. Would appreciate any info about him.
  29. 1 point
    It looks like the house made by Cranford Miniatures in the very early 1900's. An example sold at a Noel barrett auction about 14 years ago for about $12,000.
  30. 1 point
    The delrin piece that supports the cutter arm can be adjusted up/down. I don't think you'll have to replace anything. I am also not using an original-equipment cutter - plus I have it installed with the cutting point rotated ever so slightly off of vertical (I can see it but I'm reluctant to change it because I've made some parts and I want the others to match). Either of those things could easily account for my issue, which is somewhere on the order of about 0.012" (best guess). I guess what I'm pointing out is that each time you take out your cutter to sharpen it, or change cutters the height could change ever so slightly so adjusting the delrin is more practical than changing things out for a permanent set-up. I'm just setting a thin brass shim atop the delrin and that's working fine. I'm not motivated to tear it apart and diddle with the height right now in the middle of my run of spindles. EDIT: After re-reading Karin's post, I now realize that she's talking about matching the height on a macro level and I was talking about the micro-fine adjustments. I recommend 0.015" thick brass for the template. I have a bunch of blanks that I got from either Tom Walden or Pete Boorum and they are all about 0.015" (OK, maybe some are 0.016"). I think those will last forever. If they were thicker, it would be harder to cut them with the jeweler's saw. I have some unrelated 0.010" thick brass and it is *way* too flimsy to use for the template.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    Welcome to the forum! Your structure progress is quite beautiful. I'm guessing, but you must be close to the Kansas City Toy & Miniature Museum? It would be wonderful to be able to go to the museum frequently - I could sit in front of Mr. Robertson's 'Twin Manors' for hours and be quite happy, trying to absorb all the details. Your daughter is going to have a wonderful treasure! I love the dentil moulding. I have not made any dentils on the table saw yet; I have only made them in a pin routing class. Your results look great. We have a painter who has joined the forum, from your area too... Ben, from Kansas City... Someday I will get back to the KC Toy & Miniature Museum - hopefully for the next Masterworks event, so I hope we can meet in person.
  33. 1 point
    It is interesting request for online classes. Having just the experience of preparing to teach for my miniature club in the past, it takes up a lot of time to teach, and I can only imagine how much prep I would need to do online classes. I think for our Artisans who create miniatures on a full-time basis, would need their time to produce and sell, but they might consider online classes if folks were to pay and subscribe. So each of us have to ask ourselves how much would you be willing to pay? If any artisans are interested in the ability to chat over a phone line and share a monitor, I have this software in my office for our phone system, so I could give you a demonstration on this one, so you can see how it works, my work load is lighter in the summer months, so I can schedule this kind of demo in Jun, Jul, Aug. Having used this kind of software electronically for the past year, it can be challenging for the person at the other end, who does not know how to install files, or does not even know where the files have been installed on their computers... so what sounds like it is easy; is still work from a person where the are self-employed as full-time miniaturists. (I am not employed as a miniaturist - I am pretty sure you have to finish them to sell them.) I'm glad you found Ron's facebook page; I suspect that all small business may find it challenging to produce inventory, ship, attend shows, and stay current with social media a challenge, and I think Ron is his only employee unless one of children is assisting to learn the trade. Time vs. income might be the number one reason our artisans don't maintain incredible websites in addition to producing miniatures that captivate us! I'm just happy when I get to to to shows and my favorite artisans have inventory to sell to me! Finding that perfect hardware for a door can produce my own - I want to finish this project sense of urgency! Ron is a 2nd generation miniaturist! Mr. Hudson has some incredible information here on the fine miniatures forum, and there have been 100s of books published for making miniatures in additions to thousands and thousands of magazine articles, depending on the subject matter you want to learn. Mr. Robertson also has some incredible posts on the forum here that illustrate how he makes things, and if you watch his KC Ted Talk, it is another glimpse into the Artist and his processes. If you want to make furniture, I think The Scale Cabinetmaker Magazines and booklets are the Best! The magazines and booklets are available online as pdfs, and you can purchase them on eBay. I bet there are some YouTube Videos for turning small items on line; but I have never looked for them; I have looked at other subjects, but strangely when it comes to turning, I usually go back to a book when I'm at home and left to my own devices for learning. There are several foundational classes on wood turning in books. And you can still attend classes in your own community for full size items; you just need to always be thinking about how to miniaturize to the scale desired. I attended Marc Adams school of woodworking last year, to learn about Stereotomy. I needed to understand how to apply a drawing on paper and transfer it to wood - If you want to Casting Hardware, then I would look at the jewelry community for classes and/or books and webinars.
  34. 1 point
    I love the Guild School experience; if you want to learn from some of the finest instructors in 2019, the classes that are full are noted on the website now. Students who pre-registered, should begin receiving notification of their classes! It is a wonderful week, where you are only concentrating on making minis and being with people who also enjoy mini-merry-making events! This is your opportunity to learn from a Master Miniaturists and learn and perfect a new skill!
  35. 1 point
    The lathes.... Unimat SLs, etc. These are those mostly green machines that had 2 round bars acting as a bed that millions like me lusted over as kids at the local hobby shop. They had a wonderful brochure that showed they could do anything with the right accessories. In a sense they were a table top Shop Smith. Basicly my opinion on machines that can do everything is they do none of it well. These were also prominently featured in all kinds of projects shown in the magazines of the day and were super popular. They almost seem to have a cult following today based on the prices, in a sense it is a little like the muscle cars today but a lot less money. Guys that always wanted one now can afford to have one and they lust after all the accessories. What I didn’t like about them was the tolorences are sloppy, the center height is low, they are a pain to clean the scarf out of and the carriage. Now this is my number one and two complaints about these and these and both apply at all models of Unimats and Sherlines! The carriage is not easily removable and is controlled by a hand wheel on the right end of the bed. The lathe must be mounted up high or at the edge of the bench to leave room for your hand. The removable feature is so you can do hand turning without all this carriage stuff in the way. The other feature I don’t like is it screw barrel tailstock these lathes have. Your hands get tired turning that handwheel while peck drilling tiny holes. Unimat 3, These were the much later often white lathes with cast iron beds. The tolorences were much better as were just about everything however my big 2 complaints still exist. Sherline, These are by far the best when it comes to overall quality, looks, fit & finish, support, etc. They also have a matching milling machine that takes many of the same accessories. I should also mention that both Jerry and I have recived awards by the Joe Martin Foundation which is the parent of Sherline. Thank You! Taig, This is what I use most of the time. I think I even wrote the review in the Scale Cabinetmaker nearly 40 years ago. But the version I use is not an out of the box Taig, it has some crucial modifications. For years the Taig was not sold as a ready to run out of the box. The motors offered over the years changed. I like those I think 1660 rpm ones he was selling for $20 ages ago. They were super smooth and quiet. I don’t like the DC motors and changing speeds with the belt takes seconds and is easy. The two modifications I do are first a collect nose to take the WW style collets which Sherline makes and I use. While Taig makes a WW spindle the collet is too close to the front of the headstock not giving room for your hands and blocking your vision. I machine one of Taigs blank arbors and turn down a Sherline draw bar that puts the front of the collet about 1 1/4” out in front of the headstock. I also use the Sherline chucks, especially the 4 jaw universal, with an adaptor ring. The spindle threads are same size but the Taig is longer. The Sherline chucks have much smaller jaws and are therefore safer. The other modification I make it a woodworking style Tee rest. I started this ages ago by drilling and tapping holes in the bed and mounting a shortened Unimat 3 tee rest. I have since made my own patterned after that. Now days both Lee Vally and Taig offer a tee rest that fits without modifying the lathe. I just prefer mine. A key to this is being able to remove the carriage instantly, this take about 5 seconds. A word on the carriage, it operates on a gear and rack hence no lead screw and therefor no handwheel at the right end of the bed. It allows for much faster travel of the tool over the work giving you much better control of you cutting speeds. It is much easier to like light cuts. This feature along with Taigs lever operated tail stock makes drilling and turning small parts lightening fast. Some parts I can do faster than CNC. The bearings on the Taig are great, I have never worn any of the out! The alinement or the tailstock could be better. Anyway, those are my basic feelings on little lathes.....
  36. 1 point
    Did our Canadian Miniaturists find Mr. Robertson on live TV when you were channel surfing? I'm so impressed! He teaches, makes exquisite miniatures and can manage public speaking engagements. Mr. Robertson was a participant at the 19th Idea City Conference, in Toronto, Canada. I am looking forward to the next Miniature Masterpiece!
  37. 1 point
    An article on the show with photos of all the winning entries as well as some others. http://igma.org/miniature_masterworks.html
  38. 1 point
    Well, 46 days later and after about 80 hours of work I am almost done with this piece, I photographed the petitpoint together with the 1/12 scale print of the original photo. I am now planning on outlining the shapes that needs it with a thinner cream thread using back stitch as well as adding the red detail on the lion, the petitpoint will go on the Queen Anne table that I showed you last week, here is the link to the original table, I found this table about four years ago, I think this is one of the most beautiful Queen Anne tables that I have ever seen...especially with that needlework top! And I like the lion's story too :-) http://www.solomonbly.com/index.pl?isa=Metadot::SystemApp::AntiqueSearch;op=detail;id=96648;image_id=210811; And here is the story of the lion, it comes from Aesop's fables.
  39. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched on silk gauze #40 with one thread of hand dyed cotton by The Gentle Art Size : 12 x 18,5 cm or 4" 5/8 x 7" 1/4 189 x 293 stitches The original is in my summer house along with the aunt Olga's and a chinese one not yet finished in miniature
  40. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Also known among the miniature stitchers as Aunt Olga's carpet Stitched on silk gauze #40 with one thread of variagated hand dyed cotton The Gentle Art Size : 20,7 x 27,5cm (8" 1/4 x 11") 331 x 441 stitches The original carpet is on exhibit...in my summer house ! (inherited from my reknown russian aunt Olga)
  41. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    A collection of non-opening twelfth scale needlepoint handbags by Janet Granger. Some are stitched on 32 count silk gauze, and some on 40 count silk gauze.

    © Janet Granger

  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Corky designed and stitched this delightful bird footstool cover on 60 count silk gauze with a variety of silk threads.

    © Corky Anderson

  44. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched on 40 count silk gauze with DMC threads.

    © Corky Anderson

  45. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Sampler designed and stitched by Annelle Ferguson, the frame was made by Pam Boorum.

    © Annelle Ferguson

  46. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Annelle taught this beautiful piece at Guild School in 2012. The frame was made by Dick Hardy and the brass candle sconces by Wm R Robertson.

    © Annelle Ferguson

  47. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Lisa stitched this rug on 48 count silk gauze with over-dyed cotton threads from Simply Shaker and Weeks Dye Works, the chart was designed by Catherine Buron.

    © Lisa Salati

  48. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched by on 58 count silk gauze from an original Victorian Berlin wool work chart.

    © Elga Koster

  49. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Stitched on 50 count linen, the design was adapted from an antique sampler from 1859.

    © Elga Koster

  50. 1 point

    From the album: Needlepoint

    Herati rug stitched on 40 count silk gauze with French Knots, the chart was designed by Sue Bakker.

    © Elga Koster

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