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    • purplejuliana

      Micro-Mark Discount code for IGMA   01/29/2017

      Great News for miniature artists!!!! In support of IGMA and the world of fine miniatures,  Micro-Mark the small tool specialists, have offered IGMA a 10% discount on all their purchases.  Buyer gets 10% off all purchases and in support of the Guild Micro-Mark will donate 5% of your purchased price to IGMA Be sure to enter Promo code IGMASAVE16 www.micromark.com Can be used on sale merchandise, but cannot be combined with another offer.  For example if an item is in the close-out section on the Micromark website, the discount will apply. If they discount some items in an email (a special promotion) the 10% will not be able to be combined with that offer.  Time to go shopping!!!      

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    WeekendMiniaturist

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 03/27/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    After a long search I managed to find fir wood with tiny knots. Although it doesn't show the cathedral grain (it would have been too much out of scale) because I cut it on the vertical grain, it is perfect for my project (a drying attic). Thank you all for your help!
  2. 2 points
    1910 Cretors popcorn wagon. Test fitting various parts for alignment.
  3. 2 points
    In response to your request for more postings, here are some pics of a 1:8 scale roll-top desk. Constructed of Mahogany and Poplar because I already had these materials, but a tighter grain wood should have been used. Most difficult part to make was the tambour top. The drawers have dovetails but since they were made using an inverse cone cutter, they don't have the correct angle. I haven't started on the chair yet. Cheers, Guy
  4. 2 points
    Josje, my experience of finding in scale miniature pine or spruce is to always be on the hunt and have a stash. I found some at a local store that specializes in re-selling reclaimed / recycled building materials... you can look at old pieces of furniture at private sales, or even at the wood store... but just like silk, a stash is the way I've been accumulated in-scale miniature wood. The alternative is to contact someone who specializes in selling wood to miniaturists. Here in the USA, or for our international buyers if you want to import, I really recommend Steve & Mary Goode. http://shgoode.com/ Do tell all your friends locally, especially those in the wood working, furniture building business... they can be a great resource... just take a project with you and wow them... it never hurts to ask! I am lucky to have my own contact at a local cabinet shop, as my husband is a pro, and is always on the lookout for fine quartersawn wood for me. I even have a 1 piece of pine that he brought home has a few miniature knots... they look like tiny birdseye to me, and I know it isn't maple! I'm saving this piece for a very special project! if you cannot find suitable in-scale wood grain, you can alway faux paint the grain to get the effect you wish.
  5. 1 point
    I needed some very small C clamps. Made these from aluminum bar and 2-56 bolts. I cut three segments from off the shelf aluminum bar and epoxied then in a sandwich. I set it up in my sherline mill and milled out the slot. Then milled the blanks down to shape. I finished them off with a file. These were made for utility purpose so not refined.
  6. 1 point
    Jason, thank you for answering the call for posts! I have always wondered about music box mechanisms; I think I have a few that need repair but are not in 1/12th scale miniatures. I have a Fisher Price record player that I have always wanted to repair, that was a toy for our sons, but I have no idea how the mechanism works. I think it works like a music box, the records are grooved and it plays music, but someone overwound and it doesn't play the records anymore.... If I remember, Edelweiss on one of those records and I remember the ahah moment as an adult when I realize that the song was from The Sound of Music. I wonder if I have the same music box in my collection; it is in a little stand - like a night stand... I have wandered if that was a houseparty gift from one of the NAME events. I am amazed by the modelers who build working engines in any scale. In my participation in the Yahoo Groups Unimat Forum, I discovered that unimat / edelstaal had a steam model engine kit to retrofit a Tonka truck, and that project has landed on my to do list... crazy? I don't know if I will ever get round to the project, but it sounds like a fun gift to give the youngest son that still appreciates Tonka. I can relate to 50 projects on the lifetime list! I hope you have some time in between customers to ponder your long term projects.
  7. 1 point
    Congratulations on the new website; I like the new tone of yellow change to the golden tones. Websites seem like a lot of work while someone is working, but I'm sure it helps people find your business. Congrats on the update and it is nice to see you pop into the forum.
  8. 1 point
    Bill, if you aren’t familiar with floam, I can measure some for you. The grandchildren use it in slime production. Some supplies are stored here in my workshop because their mother thinks it makes too big of a mess! Martha in Louisiana
  9. 1 point
    Hey... there might be another option. Nickelodeon toys used to offer something called "Floam" which was a lightweight styrofoam sculpting medium. I think these things are smaller than styrofoam insulation. Jason
  10. 1 point
    I have never measured popcorn before but if Popcorn in life size is 1", then popcorn in 1/12th would be .08333 1/8" = .1250 So I think 1/8" stryrofoam is 1/3 too large. I think the only way to make realistic popcorn, is to make it. Crayola Air Dry Clay is very easy to work with, it isn't messy. It can stick to your hands but some baking powder or baby powder eliminates the sticking to your hands. You can use an old ball nose end mill to make the cavities of the popped popcorn.
  11. 1 point
    Hey there! Been busy with the new website (still). Latest customer project related to this forum is a tiny music box hidden in a 1/12 scale cabinet. I'm not building it, just repairing the mechanism. Latest personal project is research into a little known aircraft from the first World War, planing on making a 1/3 scale version (with functional engine). Needless to say this is probably one of those 5 to 10 year projects... I have about fifty of those, but this one I've got a good feeling about. Jason
  12. 1 point
    Some good instructions for stick building would be The Scale Cabinetmaker Issues 6:4 - 7:3 where they built the store. I still want to build that project. But of course can’t start that any time soon.
  13. 1 point
    Hi Elga, I will gladly accept your offer in Chicago... I will stop by the booth, as I already know where you will be located. I am thinking my tip of the duplicator's cutter should be similar in shape as the diamond shape like this... I will look at the cutters on the anker, and vega duplicators. http://www.rockler.com/diamond-carbide-mini-turning-tool-replacement-cutter Tamra
  14. 1 point
    That's a great suggestion! Thanks. And since you suggested it ... I could just buy a blank end mill holder and bore it out to 1/2".
  15. 1 point
    How long of a shank does you tap guide have? Sherline has an adapter for holding 3/8" shank mills. You could probably bore it out to 1/2". It will fit either miller lathe. Bill
  16. 1 point
    The mini knots are perfect; and the color of the floors has warmth and great visual appeal! The floors look lifesize! This is a great example of beautiful floors.
  17. 1 point
    Josje, as promised. I finished mine with a couple of coats of Watco Danish Oil, but other finishes could certainly give a more rustic look. I just love the patina and the tiny knots! Martha in Louisiana, USA
  18. 1 point
    Josje, I needed old cypress or heart pine for flooring in an 1850 plantation room. I worked with the Goodes (Tamra's recommendation) and he found the perfect species of yew. I asked him to give me as many knots as he could and he delivered! I just love it! I'm not home now, but can post a picture tomorrow. Martha in Louisiana
  19. 1 point
    Hi Josje, I have bought most of my miniature wood from www.wood-supplies.com (in England, a bit closer to The Netherlands). They have many different kinds and most have a detailed description of their possible uses. They have pine with miniature knots specifically for flooring. Hope you find what you need, Idske
  20. 1 point
    I have the real thing...it actually is spruce and it has in-scale knots. It is spruce from Canada, found some boards of it at a local Seattle, USA lumber supply. Here is an image of the wood with a ruler next to it along with a 1:12 scale window and door. I was cutting it up into wide plank flooring which was suitable for the era of the project. So basically you can find spruce planks with tiny knots but I had to sort through a stack of boards to find them. Most of the boards had larger knots and grain. The trees from the cold, far northern climates grow much more slowly and have these tight growth rings with very small knots. So where the trees are sourced from does matter a lot. Wood from Siberia, Alaska, northern Canada, Norway, the European alps, etc are more likely to be suitable for in-scale projects. For sourcing some in Europe try the keywords "alpine spruce", "German Spruce", "Austrian Spruce", Russian Spruce". It is pretty easy to find very tight grained spruce wood from luthier sources where it is called Tonewood but typically tonewood is sold as clear lumber with no knots in it because they would interfere with the acoustic property of the timber. But the nice thing about tonewood, it comes in wide but thin planks! I have a lot of those planks on hand and some are even quarter sawn. I did some 3D CAD work for a specialty lumber mill that makes tonewoods for the guitar industry so I got to take as much as I wanted from their "seconds" piles. All that wood was sourced from Alaska.
  21. 1 point
    how small do you want the styrofoam balls to break into? I know I have a piece in my basement.
  22. 1 point
    Catherine, you are absolutely correct on region... but I think the wood treasure hunt is the same as my silk fabric hunt... If I lived in the Northeast or Northwest, I know I would have a serious wood stash... We have great access here locally native wood for life size projects, just not a lot of options for imported woods, so we visit the local woodworking store through the year for fine grain boards. I did keep a cherry tree that fell in our sons yard - and this past year, I finally found someone with a saw locally that can cut it for me so I can dry it properly; I am hoping that it was a slow growing tree... our son talked me (us) into working and cleaning up the mess and I got the tree... seemed like a good deal at the time for one of us... If it is fine grain, though I probably got enough cherry for a lot of mini projects.
  23. 1 point
    I think it partly depends on where you are in the world and the piece you happen to get. Colin Bird made beautiful tables long ago out of some pear he had with tiny knots in it. It was very much in scale with gorgeous wood grain.
  24. 1 point
    I would also use fine grain fir cut vertically with the grain for the floorboards. The flooring in your photo looks like it has been burn-stained.
  25. 1 point
    I would suggest looking at vertical grain Douglas fir. If you can get closer to the sapwood the grain is finer and the color varies.
  26. 1 point
    PS: Wonderful wood supplier! Thank you for that link.
  27. 1 point
    Thank you! I do have a stash of wood which I have saved or which was given to me, just not pine. I have a contact in luxury yacht building, but they never use pine for their cabinets. Plus it is not a popular wood here at all at the moment. Unfortunately I don't have too much time to search for the right piece of wood. So I rather hoped there would be some other sort of wood which could be passed off as scale pine. Yes, faux painting is possible although I have tried that before and didn't like my results very much. I'll keep searching!
  28. 1 point
    The first three days was fairly cloudy and cold, we woke up to glorious sunny weather on Wednesday morning. Wednesday night is the only free night during Guild School, after having chocolate martini's and watching the sock competition in The Bilge two of my friends and I went down to the lighthouse. There is a pathway that goes down to the water from the lighthouse and here we witnessed a beautiful and peaceful sunset. A beautiful rose and garden on the way back to the lighthouse. From the lighthouse we went down to the dock area where it was very quiet, it was so good to enjoy a bit of fresh air and quietness with an almost full moon in the evening sky. Lobster cages! A sailing boat coming back to dock, we saw them dropping the sails for the night. A house in Castine with a Laburnum plant in full bloom.