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      Micro-Mark Discount code for IGMA   01/29/2017

      Great News for miniature artists!!!! In support of IGMA and the world of fine miniatures,  Micro-Mark the small tool specialists, have offered IGMA a 10% discount on all their purchases.  Buyer gets 10% off all purchases and in support of the Guild Micro-Mark will donate 5% of your purchased price to IGMA Be sure to enter Promo code IGMASAVE16 www.micromark.com Can be used on sale merchandise, but cannot be combined with another offer.  For example if an item is in the close-out section on the Micromark website, the discount will apply. If they discount some items in an email (a special promotion) the 10% will not be able to be combined with that offer.  Time to go shopping!!!      

Guild School class request - marquetry
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16 posts in this topic

While all you talented Artisan and Fellow members are pondering what to teach at future Guild Schools ...   are you up for a challenge?  I sure would love it if someone would consider a piece of marquetry furniture.  

 

Maybe I'm dreaming ...

 

:-)

 

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This is a great idea!  I would like to learn about this technique too.  I've been reviewing my two books about the "Walnut age of Furniture" and there are a lot of marquetry pieces.  I admit, I am a little scared to cut veneer with a jewelers saw.  It's so fragile and I'm apprehensive about tearing it with the grain of the veneer.

 

Do you think you could cut it with a special pair of scissors?   I wonder if I used applique scissors if I could just cut veneer. 

Husband indicates if it is paperbacked we can definitely use a pair of scissors.  They do have special knives, but scissors sound much easier for miniature purposes.

 

 

Tamra

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Chris, Karin Corbin just posted a link to an American Woodworking Magazine in the Carving tools forum.  Check out page 53-57 for Boulle work!

 

Tamra

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I've done inlay with Geoff Wonnacott in Chicago, and we used an exacto knife.

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Did anyone see Chris Malcolmson's inlay work at the Chicago International show 2016?  I have seen his inlay work online, but it was great to see it in person.

 

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Chris Malcomson is offering inlay class at the Chicago International Show April 2017... and his IGMA Guild School Classes for 2017 both look like they have space available.  I love that little box, Victorian Sewing Marquetry Box is the subject of a 24 hour class.

I wonder if you inlay miniature marquetry...  I found this wonderful router base in a Popular Woodworking Magazine. 

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Tools_for_Inlay_and_Pearl_Cutting/Precision_Router_Base/Precision_Router_Base.html

Do any of our miniaturists have any experience with this router base? 

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Tamra, even in full scale marquetry is usually done by hand. I did a bit of research on this lately, marquetry refers to basically picture type inlays like flowers etc. parquetry refers to geometric shapes like diamonds, triangles etc. In making inlay banding for furniture with geometric shapes they cut the shapes in long lenghts and glue it together in long strips in the desired pattern and then cut them into thin strips on a bandsaw to lay in. 

I taught this method at our club on Saturday morning in making a wooden book with a secret drawer, the outside  leaves of the book is made up with diamonds and triangles. I made a 60 degree sliding table for my table saw to cut the diamonds and triangles with. I will post some photos later today.

I find it much easier and safer to do all routing techniques on a milling machine.

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Here are the photos as promised. 

The diamonds and triangles just stacked loose.

 image_zpsre4in5tb.jpeg

The two end diamonds were trimmed after gluing and three more layers of wood with mitered corners were added, cutting and gluing the mitered strips were actually more difficult than the triangles and diamonds. If the pieces are just too small there are gaps at the mitered corners and if the pieces are just too big then you have gaps along the straight edges. I built a block big enough so that I can get at least four to six slices out of each block. One will also be able to use these pieces to build a star that can be used in a table top or any other horizontal surface.

image_zps2rizgzal.jpeg

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Looks like an excellent class!  I continue to be GWE regarding your miniature club.

I would like to do some "in scale" string inlay, and I don't think I have the x / y coordination to do string in lay with a mill -- but admire those who have the skill to do this with a mill...  

My Rockler catalog had special saws for marquetry... oh no! More tools to buy!

 

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I have this router base, and it's very well made. Now that I have a mill, I prefer it in most cases, but in some instances the router base would work better. It really depends on what you're trying to do. 

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https://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/to-make-as-perfectly-as-possible-roubo-on-marquetry

Does anyone own the French version of this book already?   The guys at Lost Art Press have translated it to English with the help of Don Williams and others... The $57 pre-order looks like a wonderful value when I compare it to Marquetry by Pierre Ramond prices on eBay...

Books are tools too...  I am very, very tempted!

Temptress of tools... a/k/a Weekend Miniaturist  -

 

 

 

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Well since I don't understand French at all, the real book as far as text won't help me much, of course the plates are definitely worth drooling over. 

I did find the original book in various formats to download, the first link is made up of lots of smaller pdf's, including all of the text and plates as far as I can see. I am struggling to page through the Internet Archive version on my IPad so I am not sure if it is only the plates or not and can't check on my computer as we had one single lightening strike during a soft gentle rain that took out my modem yesterday afternoon.

http://www.e-rara.ch/zut/content/structure/4124136

https://archive.org/details/gri_33125009321916

https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/lart-du-menuisier#/?tab=about&scroll=94

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:)  uh oh... did we hijack the thread?  Am I in trouble now?!  should we move this?

Great links Elga...  Now I definitely want to buy the book; (I love my library!)

Are the two of you putting your piece under the mill and freely moving the wood or are you using your cross slide?

 

 

 

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Tamra, I answered your question in the milling tutorial.

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I use the cross slide to initially position the table, but not usually while I'm milling. I move the work piece freely or against the fence. 

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