• Announcements

    • purplejuliana

      Micro-Mark Discount code for IGMA   01/29/2017

      Great News for miniature artists!!!! In support of IGMA and the world of fine miniatures,  Micro-Mark the small tool specialists, have offered IGMA a 10% discount on all their purchases.  Buyer gets 10% off all purchases and in support of the Guild Micro-Mark will donate 5% of your purchased price to IGMA Be sure to enter Promo code IGMASAVE16 www.micromark.com Can be used on sale merchandise, but cannot be combined with another offer.  For example if an item is in the close-out section on the Micromark website, the discount will apply. If they discount some items in an email (a special promotion) the 10% will not be able to be combined with that offer.  Time to go shopping!!!      

Leaderboard

  1. WeekendMiniaturist

    WeekendMiniaturist

    Moderators


    • Points

      20

    • Content count

      932


  2. CollieFeathers

    CollieFeathers

    Members


    • Points

      13

    • Content count

      60


  3. ElgaKoster

    ElgaKoster

    Members


    • Points

      10

    • Content count

      891


  4. Miniature Studio

    Miniature Studio

    Members


    • Points

      8

    • Content count

      42



Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 07/19/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Look at THIS! Laughing witches, complete with bat wings, spider's web and a gorgeous background. This will HAVE to be the doors of a wardrobe for a haunted dollhouse one day.
  2. 3 points
    Progress! The rooks and knights are finished. On to the bishops.
  3. 2 points
    I have been turning very small items out of corian, it turns beautifully smooth with sharp tools. It comes in many colors, I bought small slabs from a knife makers supply shop that I cut into short square strips on my table saw and then turned it into round rods so that it will fit into collets.
  4. 2 points
    No, the clock is not a working one, although the hands of the dial are separate and were cut out of brass, fashioned, and then painted black. The window is of plate-glass. In that watch-works require adjusting and repair, especially as they age, I wasn't inspired to include one. It's a full dial, make no mistake, just like a real one, but with no mechanism. Even the Moon dial is a separate component, albeit incomplete if one was to rotate it. A close-up of the clock-face; the Moon is something of a self-portrait...
  5. 2 points
    It occurred to me that if you're planning to cast the original turned piece, blue or green jeweler's wax will hold excellent detail and the striations can be polished out with mineral spirits. I've turned almost paper thin plates and bowls out of it, and it's very strong. I haven't tried turning aluminum, but brass can be turned without striations with a bit of practice, and can be polished easily and quickly on the lathe with a flex shaft or Dremel followed by a rouge or polishing paste. Your queen looks spectacular!
  6. 2 points
    Copy in oil on wood panel. John Constable. 1802.
  7. 1 point
    Hello all, First, thank you for your patience, as this project is going to take quite some time, as I intend to electrify it, à la round-wire; not to mention the various permanent fixtures to be incorporated. The house will be a simple two-story, and constructed of 1/2"(nominal)-thick, cabinet-grade plywood. I have the first floor drawn out already... I also have the upper floor drawn up, albeit virtually at present... I couldn't imagine a bathroom being 15' deep, so I laid out an upper-level porch, or veranda, beyond the bathroom and the short hall. The bedroom is almost as generous in size as the living room. The ground floor will rise 10"(10') in height, and the upper floor 9"(9'). In so far as a space-hogging staircase, it will have to exist in the imagination. I may include a shallow bay window at the front of the dining area within the kitchen. The house will have a flat roof, yet slightly domed, and there will be fireplaces on both floors, within the living and bed rooms, along with an exterior chimney and cap. The house will serve primarily as a backdrop for the miniatures I make and offer; but also for my mother to enjoy, in these, her golden years. Thank you for looking. Alan
  8. 1 point
    In the small world, monoliths, and of solid mahogany... They've been marked with graphite. Hmm, for what might they be... ...?
  9. 1 point
    Good design humor! It looks good, and the paint program provides a good illustration... I like stairs with landings... seems like a good use of space, as the stairs to 2nd floor in our home has two landings, and I will have to measure the clearance... Even almost -mini- real- me thinks 5' is a little short... perhaps you can increase the landing size, and move two of the bottom stairs up? The concept of realism always pulls at my head, and probably 95% of the people in the world are taller then 5' when they are grown up, heck there are a lot of children that are taller then 5' that are not adults....just a thought for today... You loose the floor space on the first floor by increasing the size of the landing. I always want to add to the floor plan when I'm doing stairs. Figuratively, the house becomes larger after I build the staircase, so for my first scratch build I am building the stairs first, and the stairs become one of the focal points, or for me the heart of the build. Even as I tour homes for sale in my local community, I have always been drawn to the stairs... it is difficult to get a bed, dresser and wardrobe up the stairs when they are only 2' wide.... so then I am back to the illusion of stairs vs. the reality of putting real, functioning stairs into the build. Our stairs to 2nd floor, are two stairs, landing, 8 stairs at 90 degrees, and 3 stairs and landing at 90 degrees... (I hope this make sense, stairs are challenging to me.) Illusion or reality? Decisions are so much fun... will you trim them in the same manner as a joiner would do in real life? I was going to route my trim into each stair, instead of applying molding under each stair tread. I hope I have my terms correct; no caffeine... trying to abstain until noon!
  10. 1 point
    Except for the reality of no stairs in the floor plan, and how does one get to the next floor, visual and philosophical question... It is possible instead to create the illusion of stairs. In our Home, the stairs to our basement is behind a door in the kitchen; the stairs to the 2nd floor is open. Most of the time, that door is closed. The stairs behind the door might be a good option for you. For stairs going up to the 2nd floor, you can leave the door open and you see two stairs and a landing... and it suggests there is a full stairwell there; our brains fill in the details just as if we were modeling a movie set.
  11. 1 point
    Did the lathe and lathe tools arrive ? Based upon my out of the box experience with my micro mark mini turning tools, they had to be sharpened. My gravers arrived sharp from GRS Tools.... being new to turning, I admit I didn't understand what sharp was, until my fearless instructor told me that those tools need to be sharpened... Another, oh my god, when-will-i-stop-being-clueless- moment. But thankfully he was quite gracious.
  12. 1 point
    I am so proud of you Martha, your chair looks great. I managed to upload your photo of the underside of your chair seat. Your woven tape is beautiful, I love how you coordinated the colors with the stitched chair seat.
  13. 1 point
    Congratulations on finishing your chair, and so quickly too. It is a fabulous accomplishment for student and teacher! I saw the underside on Petitpointers group today, that detail is not frequently included, but the straps are a fine indicator of the quality of the chairs in real life; your attention to detail is excellent!
  14. 1 point
    ah... nice square corners for the windows... <sigh> my RGT kit must have used a router bit to cut out the windows. Oh, and I remembered in reference to the subject of glass, I was considering ordering a huge quantity of glass covers that are used on smart phones. They are micro thin; I have not figured out how or why that tiny piece of glass stays on my phone, especially since I have dropped it a few times, getting out of my car...so it is another resource of glass options; I just fear I won't be able to cut it with a glass cutter. And you can purchase them as single panes... my phone has rounded corners, but if I bought the largest size glass that is offered for a smart phone, I can cut the glass to square corners or keep the surface the same -or- allow for rounded edges on the interior of my design. Just one more day of work, and then I'm back to being a weekend miniaturist. I'm pretty comfortable using a glass cutter on the dollar tree glass source. I hope to get back there this weekend - and hopefully back to the lathe to work on the needlework stand. Update: This morning I discovered I cracked my protector screen on my cell phone, so I have removed it and measured it with dial calipers. The thickness is 1/64 of an inch or .016". Amazing... so it is an excellent resource for a high end piece that needs micro thin glass. I will be happy with the dollar tree solution for the windows in my house though. Now that this is broke, I can see if I can cut it with my ordinary glass cutters and some cutting oil... and at least it is only the protector piece of glass on my phone and not my phone.
  15. 1 point
    Ok, we have a base. Is the "rest" drawn and done? Oh, I forgot I said I will be patient. If I'm not doing my build, at least I am going to enjoy following yours! I have an entire tray of rosewood sawdust, courtesy from my current needlework stand project. (how many spindles does it take to make 3 micro ACCURATE turnings...I'm not telling, but the saw dust may provide some evidence.) If I save that sawdust, there is going to be some explaining when Dear Husband catches that I save it in a jar... I wonder where I can store it and he won't catch on that I saved sawdust. That is a neat idea for wood filler.
  16. 1 point
    I know i have an old Montgomery Wards Catalog, and an old Sears Catalog... it is like entering a time machine... but I don't know where they are; they are not in my bookshelves, they are somewhere in the piles for projects reference, which could be anyplace in our home... I would suggest eBay or interlibrary loan search for a catalog reprint. You can also purchase the original catalogs. If it is important, to have an original catalog, expect to pay more, or be very patient... I hunted a circa 1917 Sears Catalog for years, because that was the year our home was built. If I find my catalogs, before you are able to find another resource, I will look at the rocking chairs for you.
  17. 1 point
    You are making good progress, looking forward to seeing more progress on your house.
  18. 1 point
    They did make rocker chairs that low, google antique sewing rocker chairs. Love your wood finds and the withches are just fantastic! Enjoy your new lathe.
  19. 1 point
    I imagine hundreds of miniaturists slicing tree branches tonite to find witches in the cross cuts. That is amazing find. You definitely had me with these knots can be turned into miniature bowls! Congrats on your new equipment acquisition!
  20. 1 point
    So, then had a dilemma. Tried to turn some pieces on the metal lathe and it wasn't working well. For one thing, I do not have ANY wood turning tools whatsoever, much less mini turning tools. The lathe rest I've been using for the chess pieces is NOT made for this lathe. It's very floppy and you can't get close to the work at all. Since the chess pieces are VERY short, it worked for those. I could wedge the rest tightly and just use the gravers and diamond files to turn the antler. The tail stock had to be put on the lathe, which made using the metal carbide tools very difficult to move back and forth - not much room. Learned about being able to do that with this machine, but still not so useful for wood. My dear husband decided to give me my Christmas gift early and I have the Micro Mark wood lathe coming with the mini set of turning tools. Was able to use the Promo code from this forum, too, for a discount. YAY! Then went back out to the shop and cut some blanks from the same branch to turn when the lathe gets here.
  21. 1 point
    These knots could be turned into miniature bowls! (Add another project.)
  22. 1 point
    So, then I had to find my lumber. Had some pieces of white oak from the chess board project and started to mill them, then thought - these are boring and the grain is a bit big. And since I've always loved the idea of going out on my wooded portion of property (an acre) and finding my own timber from this gorgeous area of the country, that's what I did. I cannot believe how much FUN I had doing this. There are oak trees everywhere, some very old and very large. They drop dry branches all the time. So, I picked one of these up and took it to the shop. And sliced the entire branch down into lumber. (Used the bandsaw for this.) It was like opening geode stones. With every cut, I got so excited with what I was seeing. What's in that one? How about if I cut it the other way? Oh, that's pretty TOO. I was worried I wouldn't be able to cut the lumber thin enough, but I could make paper thin cuts. Realized I could make veneers! Actually, at one point, had a problem cutting it THICK enough. lol. The grain of the lumber is very tight and in scale. There are worm holes to scale! And beautiful colors.
  23. 1 point
    Hi Elga. Corian sounds interesting. And a very available material. May have to try it. I also have a bit of jeweler's wax I could try.
  24. 1 point
    It's beautiful Alan. All your work is beautiful. The reason I asked about the clock is that a Grandfather clock is on my list to make.
  25. 1 point
    I went to the Dollar Tree Store Saturday... and purchased one frame, so I could open immediately when I got home to measure. Yes! It is 1 mm green edged glass... I will have to find a corresponding cutter, I think I have a key set cutter that will work, to do my windows for the glass to set in. One more barrier has been removed. I'm going to purchase the other two options to measure the glass, and then will purchase a nice qty for my mini home build. It is fun to lay these houses out in our heads... I even bought large graph paper to get mine on paper... Chimneys and brickwork - I need more research on this subject - I'll have to get to my old house forum to find more photos if I can!
  26. 1 point
    Ben, I like the colors and texture! It looks great!
  27. 1 point
    That is a beautiful queen... I have an 8' length of acrylic rod, I wonder how many feet it will take for me to make a chess set... (ha...) Don't you love gravers for tiny turning tools?
  28. 1 point
    The first floor is cut out... I don't have a table saw, but I do have an English-made(a bit odd, that) Makita® jigsaw, and their finest model some ten years ago or so when I purchased it... It works so well that it's almost a crime to own and operate one. I squared a fine-cut wood blade with the jigsaw's shoe, and whirred away. The foundation for the ground floor will be installed next, and to be footed. I have an 8' long 1" x 2" of clear pine for that, but I will need to make provisions for installing a row of mini two-pole on/off rocker switches, and so to turn the circuits on and off as desired. Scratch that 1x2, as I'll want to make the foundation a bit taller.
  29. 1 point
  30. 1 point
    Very much enjoying your work, Alan. Does the Grandfather clock work?
  31. 1 point
    hmmm... I have two sons, and neither is willing to make me a dollhouse. Son #2, is willing to cut it out for me with a prepared list on the full size table saw, but he has drawn the line and his job is complete after the cut list is finished. (Perhaps your Mom could call both of my sons!) Having a son make Mom a dollshouse would be high on the list! Can you laser the holes in glass? Surely you have a maker space somewhere near you with a laser...even I can go use the laser at our local makerspace, relatively inexpensively too. Our population is approx 267,000 in our county...? And as a computer technician, perhaps programming a few holes would be easy? I watched a You Tube video where a laser etched glass this past week, of course normal thickness of glass, but I wonder what would happen with ultra thin glass... My delta benchtop drill press - will not work for the key operation; sounds like I need to figure out how to set up my unimat in its overhead mill / drill press operation; I have it semi-dismantled, as I found the watchmakers spindle for it, and I have been playing. Brass files so easily by hand; I am still surprised by this each time I work with brass. OK, you have done it now; I concede a great reason for a micro drill press, but I've been trying to avoid the equipment acquisitions, and how many keys will I really make? I look forward to your progress!
  32. 1 point
    Alan, Is your Mom your handler that absconded #14?!!! I think my Mom, or a significant other are the only people that are likely to get away with absconding my miniatures... I am enjoying your posts and photos. Thankfully my husband's interest in miniatures is enabling my hobby. The hangers are lovely touch, that I had not considered making them in wood; it amazes me that miniaturist can still surprise me after all these years with a tiny detail that makes the heart smile. That is nice key in your clock door; I was working on a little key until about 1 am last nite for my spice chest... I had a nice oval, but I would like to have to side by side overlapping circles as your key handle shows.... so much for my hands to accomplish, so that was my 2nd key; I'm going to try one more... Welcome to the forum!
  33. 1 point
    Next project is a 1:8 scale roll top desk. I needed a dovetail jig, but could not find one, so I fabricated the one shown. The size and spacing of the tails and pins is determined by the inverted cone diameter and diameter of the shank right above the cutter, so various configurations are possible. Cheers, Guy
  34. 1 point
    The twelfth was a half-scale bathtub, and given to a friend. Call me superstitious, but there was never a thirteenth. The last of my legacy miniatures, and the fourteenth: the "Aviary" armoire, and the first of my painted works... ...featuring two extinct species of birds: the Passenger pigeon, and the Carolina parakeet. The door handles, when locked, were aligned in such a way as though the peacocks were roosting upon them. The insides of the doors were lined with movingui... I just had to include one of the two of my most favourite of birds: the Dodo, but on the backside of the cabinet... When my handler's staff first examined it, they thought that the birds were decals, until they held it up to the light. My handler absconded with this one, with no compensation, and never to be seen again. Thank you for looking.
  35. 1 point
    The tenth was a small chest I had made for an in-law, and featured colourful pieces of veneer. The eleventh: a colour television console, c. 1975, of cherry, and very much like the one my family once owned...
  36. 1 point
    Welcome to the forum and yes please show us the rest of your work. We never tire of seeing other people's work.
  37. 1 point
    This has been fun to watch your progress! Congratulations! I am looking forward to your feedback about dyeing the deer antler.... I really like the translucent quality of these pieces. The results have been wonderful...and I've learned much about other natural substances to turn, like walrus ivory and deer antler, in addition to the bone discussion that we had when Mr. Robertson was talking about his beautiful bone box... I'll have to find some hunters within the circle and ask about the deer antlers...
  38. 1 point
    This painting is in oil, on a panel. It is about an inch by two inches roughly.
  39. 1 point
    CF, If you can get an indexing tool for your metal lathe that will help. It will allow you to put a stop on the turning (keep it from turning) and then you mill with your cross slide attachment if you have one. In reference to your rooks, aw gee, I want to join the chess pieces challenge if I were not knee deep in past unfinished projects. it is taking an incredible amount of discipline for me to not start turning chess pieces tonite! I am really looking forward to this project having watched your beautiful results. I'm inclined to try what I have on hand first, which includes a can of Ebony Stain, and Rit dye... and when all else fails, enamel thinned paint (from testors) or a sharpie marker! I'm not an acrylic paint fan, but I loved the old polyfil enamel air brush paint.
  40. 1 point
    Hi Jason, I would love to have working door knobs and strike plates... period door knobs that work, would definitely spark joy for me! I would like dimensional hardware, we seem to still have access to stamped and etched hardware for Chippendale, but French hardware would be great, and Period Victorian hardware would be wonderful too.
  41. 1 point
    until
    Miniature Masterworks at the National Musuem of Toys an Miniatures (T/m) will be held September 15-17, 2017. To participate in Friday's preview, follow this link to purchase tickets. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/miniature-masterworks-preview-and-sale-tickets-31428160474 http://www.igma.org/miniature_masterworks.html I wonder what wonderful creations our artisans and fellows will create for this show - only 3 months to finish those one of kind / limited pieces for the collectors! Did you buy your ticket? August 11, 2017, Update The Masterworks Committee is pleased to share the schedule of additional events
  42. 1 point
    One of the pieces that I will have for sale at the Masterworks show, a tiny wooden box with a secret drawer in the shape of a book based on a real antique dating from the 1840's. As small as this is it turned out to be a lot more work time wise than what I expected...so what else is new! The finished book is made from birch, cherry and imbuia...basically because these are softer and easier woods to work with and I am teaching this as a class at our local club. The other wood combination is made from three South African woods namely mopane, yellowwood and blackwood and the ones made from this wood combination are the ones that will be for sale.
  43. 1 point
    Most of the drawers that I make in miniature has blind dovetails in the drawer fronts and up to now I have used inverted cone burrs for cutting the dovetails, but I have always felt that the angles are not steep enough to give a good result in 1/12 scale. So yesterday I tried my hand at making my own from oil hardening drill rod. I first turned them to size and shape on my lathe and the cut the teeth on my mill. Next came hardening and tempering them and then of course sharpening the teeth. I am pretty happy with the results off my first two cutters, you can see that the angle are steeper than the cut I made with the burr on the right. My cutters aren't pretty at all (be gentle, this is the first time I tried anything like this) and I guess time will tell how long they are going to last. I think next time I might try just two teeth that are a bit thicker.
  44. 1 point
    Here are the photos as promised. The diamonds and triangles just stacked loose. The two end diamonds were trimmed after gluing and three more layers of wood with mitered corners were added, cutting and gluing the mitered strips were actually more difficult than the triangles and diamonds. If the pieces are just too small there are gaps at the mitered corners and if the pieces are just too big then you have gaps along the straight edges. I built a block big enough so that I can get at least four to six slices out of each block. One will also be able to use these pieces to build a star that can be used in a table top or any other horizontal surface.
  45. 1 point
    Examples of a collection of miniature Ancient Egyptian pottery I made recently. Van T Potter.
  46. 1 point
    I am glad that nobody bloged that I had passed on as I am quite alive and very happy to be doing miniatures again after eight years without a studio to work in. I hope to be accepted into the National Museum of Miniatures show and sale in Sept. and waiting for my membership in IGMA to be renewed. Any questions I am at 337 285 6003 or jggueno@cox.net. I know this was an old blog but I though some people might check it every now and then. Thanks for bringing my name up. Jeffery Gueno, know as Le Chateau Interiors. PS. You can view my new studio on my facebook whatever. (Not good at that.)
  47. 1 point
    I would use Krylon "Looking Glass " mirror like paint sprayed on the back of a thin piece of plexiglass or even a laminating sheet. It would look more mirror like than using silver paint on the front.
  48. 1 point
    I would suggest a zero clearance push stick. Just take a scrap board about an inch thick and 6 inches wide and cut off most of a small strip from one long edge but leaving a notch at the end. Now use the push stick to completely cover a narrow workpiece and push the workpiece through the blade. The blade will cut through the workpiece and into the push stick but if you are making repetitive cuts of the same narrow width the resulting kerf will always be in the same position and the push block will last a long time. The width of the push stick will keep your hands well away from the blade.
  49. 1 point
    I think hands on classes are the best for learning brass turning, so for any of you not having taken such a class before...I would suggest to watch out for when Bill Robertson teaches a class like that again...best to learn straight from the master :-)
  50. 1 point
    As I stated above, the thread size is 0.55 mm x 0.125 pitch........ About the only way to get these are in these older watchmakers sets, new, when they were last made they sold for thousands of dollars, used, which in some cases just pre owned and never used, they can found on eBay for in the hundreds of dollar range..... Just be careful the taps are all broken, most sets have three of each size in each aluminum tube. These sets go from 0.30 to 1.20 mm. The main brands are Favorite and Bergeon, both Swiss made. And my latches are finished, I needed 6 and as with everything I always make an extra....... On the last picture, note the little threaded knobs..... They are small.....