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    • purplejuliana

      Micro-Mark Discount code for IGMA   01/29/2017

      Great News for miniature artists!!!! In support of IGMA and the world of fine miniatures,  Micro-Mark the small tool specialists, have offered IGMA a 10% discount on all their purchases.  Buyer gets 10% off all purchases and in support of the Guild Micro-Mark will donate 5% of your purchased price to IGMA Be sure to enter Promo code IGMASAVE16 www.micromark.com Can be used on sale merchandise, but cannot be combined with another offer.  For example if an item is in the close-out section on the Micromark website, the discount will apply. If they discount some items in an email (a special promotion) the 10% will not be able to be combined with that offer.  Time to go shopping!!!      

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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 05/23/2017 in all areas

  1. 5 likes
    Hi these are 12th scale miniatures I made in 1997, all made from antique mahogany. The small table was made by Michael Walton.
  2. 4 likes
    "Wouldn't it be great to have an adjustable height tool post?" Sherline has a rocker tool holder so that the tool cutting height can be adjusted. Years ago Bill R put me onto using two 1/8 lathe tools bits stacked up. the advantage of this is that there is less tool to sharpen and one can get tighter into the machining. I had problems keeping the two tools stacked. Especially when I tightened the clamping screws down. To solve this I machined a holding fixture to contain both tools. The groove is slightly oversize to make getting the tools in and the groove is slightly shallower than the total height of the tools when stacked. This allows for holding the tools firm when clamped in place.
  3. 3 likes
    My lights are much better with the LEDs added, but I sure can't get a decent photo of the room with the lights on, I tried during the day and in the dark, and if the scene isn't yellowed it's overpowered by the bright light glare. It's not the type of photo I've ever had to take before now, but suffice to say the scene looks much better than before and this photo might indicate. The LED bulbs are behind the walls, the chandelier and table lamp are normal bulbs
  4. 2 likes
    Will post photos of this soon. Found a rocking horse in an antique consignment shop that is VERY old and in such great condition. Even the original saddle is on the horse WITH the stirrups and the leather colors. The bridle is gone, the tail (probably real horse hair) is gone and the mane is loved off. The ears are there though. The eyes are glass. The horse itself is covered in cow or goat skin with a pinto pattern and that is over a wood/carved frame with some unknown type of stuffing. I didn't see any bald spots or cracks or breaks at all on the skin/hair. The horse is on rockers but also on a base that has wheels so that it can come off the rockers and the children can ride it without staying in one place. This is all there, intact and WITH original colors/paint. My husband took measurements and cell phone photos which are distorted but I can work with them. We are going back tomorrow to move the "DO NOT RIDE" signs and get better photos.
  5. 2 likes
    Well, I kind of lean towards the wooden box too...and I always think it is best to make the one you like the most, otherwise I find the enjoyment in the making goes awol.
  6. 1 like
    Hi Everyone. The high level of craftsmanship and imagination for scale miniatures that I have seen here is so amazing. Looking forward to learning so much through this group and improve my own work and maybe help others learn, too. Professionally, I worked in the Stained Glass industry for over 20 years and currently I work with ceramics and pottery. As a hobby I make miniatures to scale using just about every media, depending on the miniature. Specialties are equine related. This is a photo of an "in the round" 16 stall horse stable in 1:12 scale I made (with my Father's help) when I was 18 years old. It was 6 feet long and the roof came off to work with it. It was built outside. That is actual ice and snow on it in the winter photo. Meg
  7. 1 like
    Meg, I think it is wonderful that you and your father had a project together. The snow and ice is very realistic, you must have some champion horses in your stable. I look forward to hearing about your projects. Welcome to the Forum!
  8. 1 like
    Thank you, Darren and Weekendiniaturist, for welcoming me to your forum. As soon as I have something worthy to show, I will certainly share it with you all. And I also hope to learn from all the knowledge and experience that is gathered here. For now I concentrate on reading up on miniatures. I have for that reaason acquired John Davenport's "making miniature furniture," Graham Spaldings "Making unusual miniatures," and Harry W. Smith's The art of making furniture in Miniature." @ Weekendminaturist: Unfortunatey we have already planned our summer vacation, because Danmark does sound very interesting. For those who are lucky enough to be in Castine right now, I hope that their endeavours succeed. And Yes, the Kensington fair in December is on my wishlist. I hope that I will be able to go there his year. Huibrecht.
  9. 1 like
    One method you can use is to clamp a small piece such as a table leg in the jaws of a wood handscrew clamp. Just do an image search with handscrew clamp as the key word if you don't know what they look like. Many of the table legs have flat surfaces up at the apron end and you can grip onto the leg in that area. If you wanted to secure the handscrew clamp to a workbench top that is simple to do, you just clamp that clamp to the bench top. Or you could put screws through the wood jaws and secure it to a bench or table top that way. You can also hold them inside of the jaws of various types of larger vises. As the jaws of the handscrew clamps are made of wood it is possible to modify their shape to fit the piece you are clamping with it. So if you were doing production work you could then make custom jaws and then just thread them with screws when you need them and store them when not required. You have lots of options for making custom holding fixtures using the method of creating pockets in the surfaces of mating "jaws" that can be screwed together then taken apart. You could even incorporate grips on such things to facilitate holding them by hand while you carve. Making your own jigs and fixtures is an important skill to have. Like any skill practice helps a lot but you have to make the decision that you are going to deliberatly practice imagining how you can do something to get better at it. The more you practice figuring out how you could hold small items the quicker the solutions will come into your brain. You don't actually have to be making anything to practice this skill. Just look at something and see if your imagination can come up with a method of holding the part steady and safely while you work on it. For instance just incorporate it as a creative puzzle game it into your habit of internet browsing for miniature furniture inspirations.
  10. 1 like
    Hello Huibrecht! Approx 9.25 hours from you, there is a similar Miniature learning event, July 10-14, 2017 in Denmark. http://www.miniatureitune.com/danish/ If you haven't planned your vacation, perhaps you may want to look at this learning experience to jump start miniature making efforts. The forum has been quiet, but this week miniaturists from all over the globe are atttending Guild School in Castine, Maine, USA. I have not attended the Miniatures in Tune event, but if I understand correctly, the event is similar to our Guild School in the States. It looks like a hour flight to London, so if you get the opportunity do attend the Kensington Dollshouse Festival. I think they have two shows a year, 1 in May, and 1 in December... I am sure this show would amaze anyone, new or long time collector; The Kensington Show is definitely on my wish list. http://www.dollshousefestival.com/ Welcome to the forum!
  11. 1 like
    Hey Huibrecht! Welcome to the forum - look forward to seeing your work!!
  12. 1 like
    The problem high holding a piece in a fitted hole it that it can jump out and cause a severe cut or ruin the piece. If you do use the mat board with cut out I suggest using some double stick tape under the piece to help hold it in place. I find it best to hold the piece in my hands. I find the kevlar glove to be the best solution. There is also alligator tape that can be wrapped around fingers and thumbs to form protection. The gloves and tape are usually available in Micro Mark. Although the tape does not go by that name there it is all the same thing. It is gauze impregnated with sticky wax so that it sticks together when wrapped.
  13. 1 like
    Thanks for the compliments! Most of the fancy brass strip I bought in the UK from Miniature shops or traders. The smallest fender was made using the brass channel around an old hand mirror from the tip shop! I very carefully straightened it out and I am pleased with the outcome! The square brass rod for the corners is from the local hobby shop and the finials and knobs I turned from brass rod. The bases are all made from scrap brass from a friend's 'stash'! Total cost in money for the 4 fenders and 2 screens was about $9. Cost in time and frustration: months!!!! Jan
  14. 1 like
    This is a miniature I've done recently. I didn't measure but roughly 2 inch by 2 inch. It's in oil on a gesso panel
  15. 1 like
    Which is why Benvenuto Cellini said in his book... Let the gilders do it. Nothing like heavy metal poisoning... Ask the Mad Hatter. ;-)
  16. 1 like
    Duh? Those are pictures of the miniature aren.t they? I really thought it was the original full size building. I was waiting fro pictures of the miniature. How great! Like Bill R I am interested in the materials you used, especially for the castings. Bill H