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    • purplejuliana

      Micro-Mark Discount code for IGMA   01/29/2017

      Great News for miniature artists!!!! In support of IGMA and the world of fine miniatures,  Micro-Mark the small tool specialists, have offered IGMA a 10% discount on all their purchases.  Buyer gets 10% off all purchases and in support of the Guild Micro-Mark will donate 5% of your purchased price to IGMA Be sure to enter Promo code IGMASAVE16 www.micromark.com Can be used on sale merchandise, but cannot be combined with another offer.  For example if an item is in the close-out section on the Micromark website, the discount will apply. If they discount some items in an email (a special promotion) the 10% will not be able to be combined with that offer.  Time to go shopping!!!      

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Showing most liked content since 02/25/2017 in all areas

  1. Elizabeth Gazmuri

    Impressive miniaturist

    In the April 2017 issue of Woodworkers Journal magazine there is an article about Marco Terenzi who specializes in making miniature tools that work. Most are 1/4 scale. I had never heard of him. His work is beautiful. Metal workers especially might be interested in taking a look at his website www.marcoterenzi.com . .
    2 likes
  2. Wm. R. Robertson

    Miniature Masterworks, September 2017

    We are getting ready to release the whole weekend details pretty soon. There will be the public activities held at the museum, Fri. to Sun. There will also be a IGMA sponsored party for the artists Thurs. and I will be hosting a open house/shop tour Sun. Evening.... Keep watching this forum for details.
    2 likes
  3. WeekendMiniaturist

    My Miniatures

    I see sweet volute carvings at the top of that chair. This is going to be fun watching your progress! >> From Elaine .... My large Georgian house with some of your chairs featured above (all except the red dining set) were featured in an article about me in Miniature Collector >magazine- July 2003.......... I got my MC's off the shelf, and I found your July 2003 issue, this is a beautiful structure, and I think I see the chairs in the dining room photo on page 25, if I find another Jul 2003 issue in my travels, I'll be sure to pick it up for you.
    2 likes
  4. I saw the times of events posted somewhere.............in any event I made reservations to attend show. This will be the first show I have attended in many years.The Friday night tickets are not yet on sale and go on sale May. Here is the link to that one : https://www.eventbrite.com/e/miniature-masterworks-preview-and-sale-tickets-31428160474
    2 likes
  5. miraclechicken

    Art Nouveau Shop

    Fantastic! I had a little trouble looking at all the pictures at your site but totally worth it managed to see them all one at a time and going back. Thanks for posting---
    1 like
  6. Catherine Ronan

    Art Nouveau Shop

    It is really beautiful. You did a great job miniaturizing all the different brick, stone and tile. I love all of the different textures.
    1 like
  7. ElgaKoster

    Art Nouveau Shop

    Wonderful work Francisco!
    1 like
  8. Jenni

    Hello from Massachusetts!

    Hello, My name is Jenni, and I'm from Massachusetts. I'm in IT by day, but my evenings/weekends are filled with all kinds of crafty endeavors. Primarily, I enjoy sewing and needlework (especially if it is 18th-19th century), but also some weaving, knitting, lacemaking, dollmaking and sewing/crafting for dolls, and just about any other craft where I can wield a needle and make things! I can't remember a time when I didn't have a dollhouse. At first, I had a small one that my Mom had grown up with, and then one magical Christmas, I received a big, colonial style dollhouse that my Mom and Dad had put together for me. What a ball I had with it as a kid! But sadly, it has been sitting in my spare bedroom, collecting dust and wanting for some repairs. I'd been thinking about it a lot over the past few months, and about how not only should I restore it, but it would be such fun to go back and outfit it properly, with my "grown up" tastes. In other words, switch out a lot of the old plastic and low quality items for more beautiful, finely crafted miniatures. So, with that in mind, and with my addiction to making things in general, I've been getting under way with all kinds of crafty adventures for my dollhouse. I really have fallen down the rabbit hole! Primarily, I've been needle pointing up a storm. I got so inspired, seeing all the miniature samplers and carpets out there, that talented miniaturists have stitched up. As I already know I love needlework, I knew I'd have to try my hand at that! Currently, I have a little sampler on 40 ct and a carpet on 22 ct under way. I am having such a ball with these, and find it to be a truly addictive pastime. I'm also trying my hand at making miniature furniture. My experience with woodworking is minimal, but everyone has to start somewhere, and to begin with, I'm just making a few simple pieces in inexpensive wood. Hopefully I'll develop a knack for it, because it would be very exciting to be able to combine my love of tiny needle point with making miniature furniture, to then create some really lovely 18th century style furniture pieces for my dollhouse! So, I'm very much looking forward to being a part of this forum. I'm sure I'll learn and be inspired by all the lovely work you all do! -Jenni
    1 like
  9. Lynda S

    Hello from Boston

    Hi All, I'm Lynda, retired and now of Boston, MA finally doing more than just reading the forum. I've always made miniatures but until my first visit to a show in 2009, had no idea what high quality work was being done. It is also where I learned about IGMA and the Guild School. I fell in love with a silver piece beyond my budget and learned that I could take a class from Pete Aquisto. So 2010 was my first year at Castine and I've been back every year since. And I did eventually get that silver. Still waiting to get my workshop set up again. So many projects, so much to learn! Thanks to everyone sharing their knowledge. Lynda
    1 like
  10. Dead soft can be a bit more difficult to saw. I prefer to glue down really thin stock, it also means you can have a long grab handle to work with without needing a big piece of metal. Use burr-life or a bar of french milled soap/ cheap hotel soap on the saw blade. Sawing sounds happy when it is going well. If you want to saw thin metal sheet, glue it to a piece of thin scrap wood (shims work great) with a water soluble glue like a cheap white school glue. Let the glue dry, then use a very fine tooth blade - ideally three teeth are the thickness of the metal. You can also glue several layers together with pieces of paper between each metal sheet (works to make wood multiples too), Once the sawing is done, soak the stack in water to dissolve the glue. We do this when sawing very thin sheets of metal for jewelry. A chart for selecting saw blade size: https://www.riogrande.com/Content/Saw-Blade-Specification-CG-html I love the 8/0 laser gold blades, but check they are facing the right directions when putting into saw frame. I use my finger and magnifiers to double check. To anneal brass you can use a creme brulee torch or heat in flame of gas stove. Here is a link: http://www.jewelryartistsnetwork.com/index/annealing-101/ Brass has many different alloys with differing properties. Many contain zinc, so always anneal in a well ventilated area. Also, it will oxidize every time you anneal it. You can "pickle" in a warm citric acid solution if you don't want the work pre-antiques or plan to solder it. There is a brass called Nu Gold available "dead soft" from Rio Grande (and others) that I have used for metal forming. Rio has as thin as 26 gauge - 016" (0.41mm). https://www.riogrande.com/Product/jewelers-brass-6-x-12-sheet-26-ga-dead-soft/130126 Here is a link to chart of what gauge numbers mean: http://www.engineersedge.com/gauge.htm Most cities have somewhere that offers introduction jewelry classes. Junior Colleges can have really reasonably priced classes and in one semester you can learn so much that you will use making miniatures.
    1 like
  11. Tim Warner

    My Miniatures

    Hi, the chair above was to have been my next chair when I stopped making miniatures for sale in 1997. It was completed 2 weeks ago almost 20 years to the day. The chair is made of antique walnut from a wardrobe made in 1908 which I salvagef for miniatures. This is veneered in 30 year old figured walnut that I thinned to 0.25mm. Tim
    1 like
  12. elainie

    My Miniatures

    I found some photos Tim.
    1 like
  13. Marty

    My Miniatures

    I still have your chairs in my dining room set.
    1 like
  14. Marty

    My Miniatures

    Hey Tim, this is Marty Stark. Glad to see you're well again. Stay that way.
    1 like
  15. WeekendMiniaturist

    Hello from USA

    It is wonderful to learn that Tim is returning to our miniature world! Elainie, for what it is worth, I think the life size world of woodworking causes me more hesitation then the tools we use for miniatures, referencing a life size delta table saw vs. the Microlux table saw... the forum does have some discussion on tables saws. I think in life size tools, the band saw, a lathe and a miter saw can be used with ease for mini making and I don't fear for my fingers. Do trust your instincts regarding safety... there is a huge resurgence of woodworking with hand tools in the life size world, and I know that Master Miniaturists Bill Robertson and Geoffrey Wonnacott both conduct classes with limited use of power tools... I remember my first class with Geoff at the Chicago International, and was shocked when I cut out my parts with a jewelers saw - so he was the person who introduced me to the jewelers saw. A wonderful simple tool, and while you can definitely cut yourself with a jewelers saw, it isn't the same thing as cutting yourself with a saw plugged into the wall. Still, I know from experience, putting a #76 drill bit into your finger still hurts, but it didn't require stitches. There are many wonderful life size woodworking schools in the US, but if you love miniatures, do consider attending Guild School, it is as Daniela in our forum is quoted, "The Best Week of the Year!" I am so glad that you were able to join the forum and finally introduce yourself. Welcome!
    1 like
  16. ElgaKoster

    Hello from Portland, Oregon!

    Welcme to the forum, I am with Tamra, stuff made from clay is on the buy list. Daniella is also teaching how to sculpt an adorable baby at the Guild Show on Friday afternoon.
    1 like
  17. WeekendMiniaturist

    Hello from Portland, Oregon!

    I loved that period of my mini making where I was making perfume bottles from beads... and I'm still purchasing beads on occasion.... don't need any, but guilty of still reviewing the bead selection a few times a year...they are just so pretty! I'm no help with the clay food and babies... I place both of these in the BUY category. I cannot recall a book for making babies in scale miniatures... ah... a late night test for my brain... I will have to scan the library and see if I have a suggestion for you. But...we have a couple of Guild Artisan members that are teaching sculpting in 2017... Jeannie Rullie has an incredible sculpting class at the Guild Show in September, and Daniela is teaching a class at the Chicago International...Daniela sculpts sweet children! I admire both of these artist creations. I know you are on the west side of the US, but at least there are a couple of options. If you are not able to travel for a workshop, Jamie Carrington has a book for sculpting Character dolls, but no babies to my recollection. Since you are new to the world of minis, do you know about these two shows? Welcome!
    1 like
  18. Wm. R. Robertson

    Hello from Portland, Oregon!

    Welcome and glad you are on here.
    1 like
  19. One of the pieces that I will have for sale at the Masterworks show, a tiny wooden box with a secret drawer in the shape of a book based on a real antique dating from the 1840's. As small as this is it turned out to be a lot more work time wise than what I expected...so what else is new! The finished book is made from birch, cherry and imbuia...basically because these are softer and easier woods to work with and I am teaching this as a class at our local club. The other wood combination is made from three South African woods namely mopane, yellowwood and blackwood and the ones made from this wood combination are the ones that will be for sale.
    1 like
  20. Moderator1

    18th c. French spinning wheels by Wm. R. Robertson

    See topic in the general section for a complete description of making these.
    1 like
  21. This afternoon I did the last step on the drawers, pinrouting them together with the mirror base to curve the fronts. Showing the drawers upside down so that you can see the drawer bottoms glued in place. I am looking forward to seeing how it is going to look after final sanding and finishing, the base still need feet and the uprights for the mirror.
    1 like
  22. Bill Hudson

    Milling wood for furniture tutorial

    If I was going to need the precision I had to tram it other wise I let it go for a while. I sold that mill. I only have my Sherline because of limited bench space. The Sherline's head stock can be tilted like the Unimat but I leave it alone.
    1 like
  23. EmmaWaddell

    Downton Abbey based kitchen design, by Dolls House Grand Designs, UK

    From the album Structures & Rooms

    1 like