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  2. WeekendMiniaturist

    2018 Guild Show Windsor, CT

    http://www.fineminiaturesforum.com/gallery/category/1-fine-miniatures-gallery/ HOT OFF THE PRESS! Pictures from the Visions of Miniature Grandeur Exhibit.... Oh, I wish I could go to this show, too. The show opens 2 weeks from tomorrow! What is your Heart's desire?
  3. WeekendMiniaturist

    IGMA Williamsburg Guild Study Program 2019

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    Attending the Guild Study Program in Williamsburg, VA is a perfect way to begin the new year. Here are details for registering and a description of the classes offered. It is hard to choose! http://www.igma.org/education/study_program_williamsburg.html I was able to attend one Williamburg Guild Study Program, and the Colonial Williamburg Hotel had great accommodations.
  4. WeekendMiniaturist

    IGMA Fellow Connie Sauve Exhibits at Mini Time Museum

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  5. Connie Sauve has been a talented student and instructor (Fellow member) at school for many years. She is a docent at the Mini Time Machine Museum in Tucson and has put together an exhibit at the museum about the Guild and the school. I believe all the minis in the photos are projects from school. Here’s the link to the museum’s website page. https://theminitimemachine.org/portfolio/connie-sauve-miniatures-from-the-igma-guild-school/ The link above says Connie will have 3 artist demonstrations, so here is your chance to talk to her in person and ask, How did you do that? Mini Time Museum 4455 E. Camp Lowell Drive Tucson, AZ 85712 (520) 881-0606
  6. Artist

    Georgian inspired study 1:12

    Yep, it's one of those thing where you cant finish one part until you finish something else, and so with the wainscotting I can't finish that until I have the fireplace completely done and set in place, then I'll have to come up with what's needed to wrap the wainscotting to it's sides. The fireplace is about 6" wide, the wall is about 7", so there will be about a 1/2" wall on both sides to the corners that have to be finished with something, a 1/2" wall is too little for a section with any panels, so it will have to be some filler moldings. The replacement fireplace is coming from Alison in the UK, I don't know why she doesn't keep a few on hand ready to ship, they take so little material it would make more sense, but her web site says she casts them to order and that it takes 3 weeks. The fireplace is fantastic though and it's going to "make" the room. I also have an overmantle from her coming too, so either that one or the one pictured will be what I'll be choosing from. The bricks came from Andy's, I could make my own but realistically when a whole bag of them were something like $6 it just makes sense to let someone else do that kind of thing. I didn't do anything special to them other than applying the mortar and wiping the excess off with a damp rag. There is a black colored fireback in there from the UK but it can't be seen in the photo. My one issue with the replacement fireplace is the opening is smaller and the top of it's opening is 1/4" higher up than what I made, but the 1/4" won't likely be an issue, I'll have to see about the opening because the design around the opening itself cant really be trimmed open larger without messing up the decorations on it, it would be either remove that completely or leave it. This can be seen in the attached photo. After the fireplace and wainscotting are done then comes the ceiling and I haven't gotten that far yet, I have the plywood for it but I haven't decided on the ceiling treatment yet, but it will have something dramatic, either designs or coffered.
  7. WeekendMiniaturist

    Georgian inspired study 1:12

    Artist, I'm glad that you told us about waiting for the fireplace decision before finishing the wainscoting, as I haven't done a raised panel room for a while, a LONG while, so this is a great reminder. I appreciate the detail in the fireplace, the brick looks used and not new. Did you make your own bricks for the interior of the fireplace? It has been fun seeing your progress! After the fireplace decision and finishing the wainscoting, what is next in the project?
  8. Artist

    Georgian inspired study 1:12

    Now that some of the parts I ordered from the UK arrived, I have the ceiling cornice all installed. The fireplace overmantle is one of two I ordered from two different people in the UK to see which I like better and which works better with the elaborate fireplace I'm waiting on, for now I just have this overmantle resting on top of the to-be-replaced fireplace which is too small. The "marble" hearth floor fits perfectly over where I had the brick one- the new fireplace is wider than this old one so the hearth floor had to be replaced and I got one sized for the new fireplace. The overmantle is only primed, I haven't decided yet on the paint for it and the fireplace, both are white plaster and the fireplace will need to be primed first. I also am waiting for the fireplace to get here before I can finish the wainscotting.
  9. WeekendMiniaturist

    Guild School June 2019 Class Selections!

    Your favorite class can fill, so if there is a class that is on the top of your list for 2019, REMEMBER to Pre-register by September 14, 2018. Pre-registration allows you to participate in the lottery for class assignments. I am looking forward to the photos on September 15, 2018!
  10. WeekendMiniaturist

    Guild School June 2019 Class Selections!

    Here is the timeline. To refresh your understanding of the registration options, click Register on the school web page and download the Preregistration Form. http://igma.org/PDF/2019_GSchool_preregistration.pdf September 14: pre-registration deadline; Class Offerings booklet is mailed to pre-registered students September 15: Class Offerings booklet is posted online and debuts at the Guild Show in Hartford November 12: for pre-registered students, registration form with class choices is due November 15: lottery drawing for pre-registered students January 2019: class assignments and Guide booklet are mailed Ongoing: registration for Guild School continues through May 1, 2019
  11. WeekendMiniaturist

    2019 IGMA Guild Study Program at Maysville, KY

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    Classes are wait-listed for the 2019 Guild Study Program at Maysville, KY! If you wish to join in the festivities, you may still be able to attend as a guest (no workshops), contact Peter Kendall to check on availability. 2019 Classes include: Swift Yarn Winder by Carol Hardy, IGMA Fellow Bookbinding and Tooling by Tine Krijnen, IGMA Artisan American Chippendale Chair by Mark Murphy, IGMA Fellow Alma Hitches a Ride by Jeanne Rullie, IGMA Artisan
  12. Scaled to Perfection: A Gallery of New Miniatures Gala Celebration April 30th – May 2nd, 2019 Following the Chicago International Show A perfect ending to your experience in Chicago. Spend three days in Maysville, Kentucky, exploring the KSB Miniatures Collection’s latest exhibition, Scaled to Perfection: A Gallery of New Miniatures. Enjoy Kaye Browning’s laid-back southern hospitality while touring the historic Ohio River town and surrounding areas, relax with your fine-scale miniatures community while examining new and never-before-seen works, and learn from some of the most talented miniaturists in the world. Silent auction Artisan demonstrations Chautauqua performance Miniatures for sale in the gift shop This is an emerging event. Check www.ksbminiaturescollection.com for event updates and registration. Visit us on Facebook and Instagram for previews! Tour the Maysville area City of Maysville tourism Facebook Instagram Travel Maysville is a six-hour drive from the Chicago Marriot O’Hare. Flights available from Chicago O’Hare (ORD) to Lexington Bluegrass (LEX) and Cincinnati N. Kentucky (CVG) airports Amtrack runs from Chicago to Maysville April 28 Discounted Lodging: Ask for KSB Miniatures event French Quarter 25 E McDonald Pkwy. Maysville, KY 41056 $85 per night 606-564-8000 www.frenchquarterinn.com .3 mile away Hampton Inn 503 Market Place Drive Maysville, KY 41056 $99 per night 606-759-0600 Hampton Inn Maysville 2.8 miles away Little Things B&B Perfect for groups: 3 bedrooms, 2 bath Call for availability and pricing 606-407-1487 Little Things B&B .3 mile away
  13. WeekendMiniaturist

    Guild Study Program Williamsburg 2019

    http://www.igma.org/education/study_program_williamsburg.html If you need a vacation in January, the Guild Study program for Williamsburg details has been posted. There are 4 fabu classes for you to choose from... so send in your registration! I cannot ever remember Jane Graber teaching a class in my decades of merry miniature making and collecting! Pete & Pam Boorum, Jane Graber, Patricia Richards and Bill Studebaker offer some great classes based upon items in the Williamsburg Collection... and I do recommend the early registration for the 9:30 am Architectural Fragments Collection Tour. This is an incredible way to begin 2019!
  14. Artist

    Georgian inspired study 1:12

    Thanks! Yes, the waterbased urethane has worked very well, I had the two quarts left over from refinishing an oak pew a while back, it worked beautifully. I cant wait for oil based stuff to dry, not with the dust at work and the dust and dog hair at home- it has to dry FAST. 3 applications over sanding sealer and it's good to go, you can even see the reflection from the brass doorplate shining under the chair if you look close.
  15. WeekendMiniaturist

    Georgian inspired study 1:12

    Artist, this looks great! The waterbased products look like they serve you well... I have never used any... I like oil... I have some molding that I need to paint, so I had them out for sanding sealer, and it is like a sauna outdoors, so no finishing here. Congrats on your progress --> details are great!
  16. Artist

    Georgian inspired study 1:12

    The floor is done now, waiting on some parts, including the fireplace. Three sections of wainscotting are glued in and the rest are primed and waiting to be finished. The fireplace is going to really make the room. I have some ideas for more furniture, at least a couple of chairs, a carpet and table of some kind to start with.
  17. Wm. R. Robertson

    Desktop Lathes

    The lathes.... Unimat SLs, etc. These are those mostly green machines that had 2 round bars acting as a bed that millions like me lusted over as kids at the local hobby shop. They had a wonderful brochure that showed they could do anything with the right accessories. In a sense they were a table top Shop Smith. Basicly my opinion on machines that can do everything is they do none of it well. These were also prominently featured in all kinds of projects shown in the magazines of the day and were super popular. They almost seem to have a cult following today based on the prices, in a sense it is a little like the muscle cars today but a lot less money. Guys that always wanted one now can afford to have one and they lust after all the accessories. What I didn’t like about them was the tolorences are sloppy, the center height is low, they are a pain to clean the scarf out of and the carriage. Now this is my number one and two complaints about these and these and both apply at all models of Unimats and Sherlines! The carriage is not easily removable and is controlled by a hand wheel on the right end of the bed. The lathe must be mounted up high or at the edge of the bench to leave room for your hand. The removable feature is so you can do hand turning without all this carriage stuff in the way. The other feature I don’t like is it screw barrel tailstock these lathes have. Your hands get tired turning that handwheel while peck drilling tiny holes. Unimat 3, These were the much later often white lathes with cast iron beds. The tolorences were much better as were just about everything however my big 2 complaints still exist. Sherline, These are by far the best when it comes to overall quality, looks, fit & finish, support, etc. They also have a matching milling machine that takes many of the same accessories. I should also mention that both Jerry and I have recived awards by the Joe Martin Foundation which is the parent of Sherline. Thank You! Taig, This is what I use most of the time. I think I even wrote the review in the Scale Cabinetmaker nearly 40 years ago. But the version I use is not an out of the box Taig, it has some crucial modifications. For years the Taig was not sold as a ready to run out of the box. The motors offered over the years changed. I like those I think 1660 rpm ones he was selling for $20 ages ago. They were super smooth and quiet. I don’t like the DC motors and changing speeds with the belt takes seconds and is easy. The two modifications I do are first a collect nose to take the WW style collets which Sherline makes and I use. While Taig makes a WW spindle the collet is too close to the front of the headstock not giving room for your hands and blocking your vision. I machine one of Taigs blank arbors and turn down a Sherline draw bar that puts the front of the collet about 1 1/4” out in front of the headstock. I also use the Sherline chucks, especially the 4 jaw universal, with an adaptor ring. The spindle threads are same size but the Taig is longer. The Sherline chucks have much smaller jaws and are therefore safer. The other modification I make it a woodworking style Tee rest. I started this ages ago by drilling and tapping holes in the bed and mounting a shortened Unimat 3 tee rest. I have since made my own patterned after that. Now days both Lee Vally and Taig offer a tee rest that fits without modifying the lathe. I just prefer mine. A key to this is being able to remove the carriage instantly, this take about 5 seconds. A word on the carriage, it operates on a gear and rack hence no lead screw and therefor no handwheel at the right end of the bed. It allows for much faster travel of the tool over the work giving you much better control of you cutting speeds. It is much easier to like light cuts. This feature along with Taigs lever operated tail stock makes drilling and turning small parts lightening fast. Some parts I can do faster than CNC. The bearings on the Taig are great, I have never worn any of the out! The alinement or the tailstock could be better. Anyway, those are my basic feelings on little lathes.....
  18. Wm. R. Robertson

    Desktop Lathes

    Hi All, many of you I know or know of. I have spent 40+ years making my living using little lathes and have had every one mentioned above. Here are my thoughts on these... First off it is important to understand why these lathes were made, who they were made for and how that differes from the type of work making models of decorative arts type objects. All of these lathes, Unimats, Sherlines and Taigs were made to serve the needs of the model engineer. These are simply small versions of the typical metal lathe. They are the next size down from the Atlas, Myfords, South Bends and the like which were home size versions of industrial machines. One other lathe not mentioned is the Manson, this is by far the cutest being a foot long copy of a Monarch 10EE. It is super cute but has such a small work window it is not practical to use for much model work, I don’t even remember the last time mine was turned on. Another class of small lathes are the jewelers or watchmakers lathes, brands like Boley, Levin, Derbyshire and dozens more. These are baby versions of tool room bench lathes by Rivett, Pratt & Whitney, Ames, Hardinge and others. All these are very fine quality, much higher than the Unimats, Sherlines or Taigs. They are wonderful assuming you have a full complement of accessories. Now all of the lathes above were made to make precision metal parts that often work with each other by being threaded, geared or pressed together. In building models of decorative arts type miniatures most of us are coping things made of both metal and wood. Often the complex curved shapes are more important than the precise fit of the part such as a candlestick. Our needs are almost that of a hybrid wood/metal lathe. The most important part in making models is holding small parts and therefor collets are a must. One thought that kind of comes to mind is a statement made at a commercial model building conference. The difference between a model builder and a machinist is, a model builder will use super glue or double stick tape to hold work on a milling machine, a machinist won’t. I’m going to cover my thoughts on the lathes in a separate post. Bill
  19. Jerry Kieffer

    Desktop Lathes

    Tamra Your best source of information on tools is the manufacturer especially with all of the erroneous speculation that is discussed on the web. When small machine tools are evaluated side by side, the weight of the tool is of no importance, only its actual demonstrated capabilities. In todays world, the most expensive machine tools costing millions are capable of machining feats that even recent machinist may not comprehend, weight is the enemy in critical areas. In regard to the Sherline/ Taig lathe beds, a few of the very first Sherlines had one piece solid brass beds. Ever since the late 70`s Sherline beds have been one piece solid steel with a height of .750" with all contact surfaces ground. The Taig bed uses a rectangle piece of steel that is .360" in height with all contact surfaces ground. I think you would enjoy the NAWCC Lathe course if for no other reason than the amount of equipment that is there for evaluation. It also presents a quite different approach to the use of a small lathe. Hobbiest of all types often attempt to use small or micro machine tools in the same manner with the same type accessories and procedures as large equipment. Under these conditions, what generally is accomplished is the result of much practice and the developed skill of the operator over time. In class we take a totally different approach, where equipment, accessories and procedures are selected so that we make the machines responsible for most of what is accomplished. Under these conditions, even some of the most difficult procedures can often be successfully accomplished on the first attempt. The student gets to experience this by their own hand. Jerry Kieffer
  20. WeekendMiniaturist

    Desktop Lathes

    I have read many pages of documentation for the Sherline lathe accessories, but I have not read about the actual lathe. I will use that as reference. I have to find The Scale Cabinetmaker issue and will review this information before I work on the review. I am sure there is a Sherline forum, as I know there is a Taig and Unimat forum, so Fine Miniatures Forum members, can also join these forums for detailed questions about the equipment, but of the two current desktop machines in the US - Sherline and Taig, Sherline's instruction for their equipment has my vote for best info available for practical use for desktop lathes. Please note, that the review is limited to equipment that I know about. Are there other desktop lathes manufactured in other countries that should be included in the review? I would consider the Micro Mark lathe to be in a different class, as I think they are much heavier in terms of weight, so I was not planning to include them in this review.
  21. Bill Hudson

    Desktop Lathes

    Check balls and springs? I wouldn't expect any thing less from youJerry. The oil cans are solid. I would love to be able to drill out the spouts and make the cans functional. I probably could do so in 1/8th scale. I posted these to show that fine turning can be done on the Sherline. I use a step method to turn the taper on the spouts then manipulate the lead screw and cross screw to knock off the steps and finally finish out with a very fine file. . I would like to go with a new Sherline but I am afraid my budget would not justify it now that I'm in my later years of life. Tamra, I believe the Sherline specification pages lists the weight of the lathe.
  22. WeekendMiniaturist

    Desktop Lathes

    Working miniatures are the best form of miniature magic... And I am smitten with tiny oil cans... I wonder who was influencing me on tiny oil cans??? Thank you Bill! Even though you are not selling miniatures as you used to you, you are still inspiring miniaturists. I have an oil can on my lathe bench to miniaturize! It took a while to find the 'right' specimen. Research, Research, Research! I know when I am attempting to cross reference the details for a piece of furniture as an example, I frequently find details missing from one publication to another, and then it makes me wonder if my interpretation is accurate. Thanks to all three of you for contributing to this forum post. This information would have been so useful to me when I was making these decisions 3 years ago. My first unimat arrived on July 3, 2015 from Canada; it was Christmas in July! Is the Sherline lathe bed from the 20 year old model aluminum and the current version aluminum too? I took my unimat off the board to look at the underside and I have a taig currently unmounted, too, so I am planning to weigh them too. I don't expect anyone to unmount their lathe from their bench, but if anyone is just setting up a sherline lathe and wants to weigh it I think this could be an important factor for future miniaturists in analyzing which lathe they prefer.
  23. Jerry Kieffer

    Desktop Lathes

    Bill If your machines are 20 years old, alignment and construction quality has been tightened up considerably along with design changes. However the alignment accessory is still occasionally used by those demanding perfection. Your oil cans remind me of a Grease Gun fiasco of years ago. This was as mentioned years ago when I built a 1/8th exact scale running fully functional 1936 John Deere model "D" tractor. This Tractor was a copy of one my grandfather purchased new. However, in running and performing functions of the tractor, it required grease in some hard to reach areas in the same manner as the original. It was determined that the easiest way to grease these areas was to build a fully functional 1/8th scale grease gun and period style grease fittings. (Attached photo) While not near as cute as your oil cans, it does pump standard grease as seen in the photo. I then removed a grease fitting from the full size tractor and scaled it down to 1/8th scale. I will never forget that it took forever and ever to machine the .010" (.25mm) functional check balls and springs. The springs were wound from .001" (.025mm) tempered cross hair wire I swindled out of a German rifle scope company. (Long story) While humorous today but certainly not then, I later found that the grease fitting scaled from was a later replacement. The originals did not have check balls and springs. At least the replacements took less time to construct. Jerry Kieffer
  24. Bill Hudson

    Desktop Lathes

    When I was selling miniatures these little 1/12th scale oil cans were popular. They are fun to make. I could sit down in an evening and turn out ten or twelve or so. These, including the spouts were turned on my Sherline lathe. This lathe is over 20 years old and still very solid and accurate. Over the years I have turned some very hard metals on it with out hurting it.
  25. Jerry Kieffer

    Desktop Lathes

    Bill There is good news and bad news. The bad news, is that the Sherline adaptor as from the factory, is a real pain to adjust. In fact, I can not remember if I have ever been able to adjust a stock one to my satisfaction. The good news is that it offers a solution unavailable from others. I currently modify and adjust the adaptor as follows. (1) I first adjust the headstock for alignment per Sherlines instructions. (2) I then machine two small diameter work pieces to a very sharp pencil point per attached photo. (3) I next replace the adjustment screws with 5mmx .80 hex head bolts and lock washers from the local hardware store. The thread is retapped slightly larger to 5mm and the adjustment holes are also slightly enlarged. This eliminates the troublesome allen wrench tightening routine allowing the use of a much easier standard ignition wrench. (4) adjustment can now be done by tightening the bolts slightly against the lock washers providing tension on the front plate. The plate can now be tapped in any direction until the two points align under optics per attached photo. Alternate between bolts tightening each slightly until tight and recheck alignment. The alignment will depend on the accuracy of your drill chuck through out its range. An alternative is Sherlines tailstock WW collet adaptor if you have a set of WW collets. Jerry Kieffer
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